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Mated queens disappearing


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Before varroa you could put a caged queen into a hive and be confident she would still be there in two years time. We have had years with high supercedure of caged queens. I don’t know what the c

Doug Somerville an Australian bee scientist did some fascinating work on queen supersedure . It's a long time since I read the research but from memory it was basically the younger you caged a new Que

The other thing is whether the Queens are just being pulled out of mating nucs and sold once mated or whether the supplier is waiting until brood is capped.  In that time the Queens pheremone levels s

Yep ..... we put out mated queens in nucs and hives, go back and check them and all is sweet, and then a few weeks later the queen is gone and they are raising their own.

Low IQ queens .... mybe did'nt get mated right .... one of the mysteries of life to keepus humble ?

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Doug Somerville an Australian bee scientist did some fascinating work on queen supersedure . It's a long time since I read the research but from memory it was basically the younger you caged a new Queen the more likely she was to be superseded. Even when not using cage Queens it can be quite common to have hives supersede within a week or two of a new Queen starting to lay. Often there appears to be no good reason for this but I believe that generally the bees know what they are doing. While it is annoying to have a new Queen fail, supersedure queens usually superb. There is probably a genetic component with supersedure and many old beekeepers I knew did not like strains prone to supersedure but personally I like them and would much rather have a new supersedure Queen than a failing one.

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21 hours ago, jamesc said:

Yep ..... we put out mated queens in nucs and hives, go back and check them and all is sweet, and then a few weeks later the queen is gone and they are raising their own.

Low IQ queens .... mybe did'nt get mated right .... one of the mysteries of life to keepus humble ?

yep thats very similar to the trouble i seem to be having bloody odd. could it be weather or heat?? 

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The other thing is whether the Queens are just being pulled out of mating nucs and sold once mated or whether the supplier is waiting until brood is capped.  In that time the Queens pheremone levels seem to increase, if at lower levels with a younger Queen the bees may give an introduced Queen the boot.

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1 minute ago, CraBee said:

The other thing is whether the Queens are just being pulled out of mating nucs and sold once mated or whether the supplier is waiting until brood is capped.  In that time the Queens pheremone levels seem to increase, if at lower levels with a younger Queen the bees may give an introduced Queen the boot.

I read on the forum that you should not Mark a queen till she has produced capped brood .

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2 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

I read on the forum that you should not Mark a queen till she has produced capped brood .

 

Hah yes I think that was a result of me marking them and seeing them get balled.  Sometimes I just couldn't help myself once I saw they were mated....but am now showing patience young grasshopper.

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On Sunday, December 03, 2017 at 7:26 AM, 8 point sika said:

hi there, is anyone having trouble with newly mated queens laying for a couple of weeks then disappearing??? 

I've came across this problem for a first time seven years ago. My advise is to use different breeder queen for grafting.

 

The antibiotics doesn't help, neither shookswarming. Good record keeping is essential. Bees and brood taken from some hives constantly gave problems if used for making nucs (slow build up, missing queens, defective queens - usually crippled leg etc). I've had one occasion the queen being supersceded 3 times for one season. The first few years was most contageous (a jar of honey could knock down a whole apiary), then it became less of nuisance

 

The most prolific queens (pale yellow) were the ones having defects (missing or ceasing laying) most often.

 

 

 

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I can't comment on what happened in the UK beyond 10 years ago but there are beekeepers here who think that young queens disappear or supercedure occurs with young queens much more often that it did. I cannot say whether this is a subjective assessment or fact as there does not seem to be any factual information in the UK about it as far as I am aware.

I HAVE had issues with supercedure and the odd queen disappearing in my own apiaries and there is some evidence that varroa is the culprit. Unfortunately it will probably not be varroa in your own hives if you manage them well, but varroa in neighbouring hives. I recall reading that sexually transmitted diseases can occur during mating.

It would be good to know if long-term beekeepers in NZ are seeing the same problems as have been reported in the UK.

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