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What constitutes a strong hive


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OK .... back to thread ..... Strong hives.   Today we put two frame nucs into duds ready to move to the secret spots.. What .... two frame nucs into a honey flow?  The catch being we papered on boxes of four frames of brood above the queen excluder  from  strong double brood box hives giving us a six frame "single decker  hive " ready to pull finger in all points north of  the desert that Canterbury  will soon be.

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A thread is a  virtual conversation in cyberspace. Conversation between real people normally meander off topic. In most social situation the person that sticks  pedantically to the topic is

I papered two colonies together a few weeks ago, never even gave it a second thought doing it.... and slid the pollen draw out a few days later to reveal a lovely messy mixture of fine grained paper a

i always put the QE on top of a sheet of newspaper , it holds it down, and the bees chew through it.

Ok thanks I think I have got it sorted now.  

 

Do we leave of pollen clogged frames in a hive for the bees to eat later?  I have move mine to the outside of the brood box. I thought bees were supposed to be smart why would the pollen clog the middle of the brood nest?  Very frustrating. 

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1 hour ago, jamesc said:

OK .... back to thread ..... Strong hives.   Today we put two frame nucs into duds ready to move to the secret spots.. What .... two frame nucs into a honey flow?  The catch being we papered on boxes of four frames of brood above the queen excluder  from  strong double brood box hives giving us a six frame "single decker  hive " ready to pull finger in all points north of  the desert that Canterbury  will soon be.

Interesting you put them above the queen excluder instead of straight into the brood nest.  

 

Yeah was lookin at NIWA summer forecast this morning hopefully that does not happen for Canterbury.  I would have thought with all the irrigation down there it would be clover everywhere 

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31 minutes ago, yesbut said:

Just for the heck of it, I've been over Mokihinui way the last few days. Rata coming on strong and manuka coming up with a good showing.

you must have had great weather

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20 hours ago, flash4cash said:

Interesting you put them above the queen excluder instead of straight into the brood nest.  

 

Yeah was lookin at NIWA summer forecast this morning hopefully that does not happen for Canterbury.  I would have thought with all the irrigation down there it would be clover everywhere 

Because the box of brood and bees is stronger than the nuc, it gives them a chance to slowly acquaint with the queen and accept her.

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On 12/1/2017 at 8:32 PM, jamesc said:

 we papered on boxes of four frames of brood above the queen excluder

i once made the mistake of putting the excluder on top of the newspaper when papering some bees into a hive. The excluder meant that the bees up top couldn't get at the newspaper to pull it apart and move down. You ever experienced something like that?

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4 hours ago, Trevor Gillbanks said:

However, I must add that I always use framed wire excluders and not the flat plastic excluders.

 

So do I 

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Plastic excluder on top of the paper but whether I'm using an excluder or not I always put a tear in the paper or simply leave a gap on one side. The hole\gap provides ventilation and communication while the paper acts as a barrier. Weak hives can take a long time to remove it all but for strong hives it is often gone the next morning.

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I papered two colonies together a few weeks ago, never even gave it a second thought doing it.... and slid the pollen draw out a few days later to reveal a lovely messy mixture of fine grained paper and pollen! Flaming muppet. 

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On 12/1/2017 at 8:37 AM, M4tt said:

One of the better examples of a thread going way off topic 

Actually the thread IMO is dead on topic and Beekeeping world wide would be much better off if more beeks could grasp the concept of trade offs with regard to selective breeding.

The running horses hoof is a perfect example.

 

 

Edited by Philbee
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30 minutes ago, yesbut said:

More so than the walking horses hoof ?

Absolutely.

The running Horse is a tern used to describe the Horse that gallops competitively, usually  under Saddle but does include gypsy Horses (standard bred trotters) .

Its these horses that suffer the most from the effects of ever increasing speed.

 

 

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I had a horse that could run. She was an Arab mare from hell and bolted on me on a gentle jaunt down to the Shag Rock for a swim. So I let her run .... and she ran, nearly five K's up a gravel road and then hit the hill. So I asked her to keep going on up the hill, which she did because she had a big heart, but she never bolted again, and I never rode her again. She became a brood mare and has produced some beautifully gentle natured offspring.

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