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Suniti

Requeen

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Hi,

 

This is my first year of bee keeping.I want to replace my queen(at least two years old). what is the best way to do it without killing her?

 

I did a split 3 weeks ago. In the new hive the new queen stated to lay couple days ago. I want to put the new queen in the original hive where there are more bees( to replace the old queen). How shall I introduce the new queen to the original hive? And what shall I do with the old queen, I don't want to kill her.

 

Thank you for your help in advance.

 

Suniti

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You could take both queens out and leave them in separate queen cages with sugar and attendants in a cool place for a day, then swap the queens around?

So your big hive gets new queen and nuc gets old queen.

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58 minutes ago, Suniti said:

what shall I do with the old queen, I don't want to kill her.

why?

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Hi Tristan,

 

Because I think the old queen has been hard working contributing to the hive, like all the other bees, I don't want to kill her when she is less valued, I know it sounds sentimental and I do accidentally kill bees when checking hive.I wonder how the queen dies naturally in nature? 

 

Thanks for your reply Qkrwogud,"You could take both queens out and leave them in separate queen cages with sugar and attendants in a cool place for a day, then swap the queens around?

So your big hive gets new queen and nuc gets old queen."

 

If I swap the old queen to the nuc, will she swam next year ? what shall i expect of her(how long will she live) and the nuc/ the price i have to pay for not killing her?

 

Thanks,

 

Suniti

 

 

 

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28 minutes ago, Suniti said:

I wonder how the queen dies naturally in nature? 

new queen hatches then goes and kills the old queen.

or the bees let the old queen live and once the new queen is laying well they starve the old queen to death.

 

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Ok , here’s how you do it . I get it . Hobbiests get attached to their queens. 

Depending on how you run your hives , you can merge them together with newspaper and a queen excluder between the two queens . 

This will give you a two queen hive and if you let it run, you’ll get a good crop of honey , and the bees ‘may’ sort the hive out for you , back to one queen by next winter . 

 

The only downside I can see is that it may be too big and powerful for a beginner , so you’d have to be confident of what you were getting into 

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Ok , here’s how you do it . I get it . Hobbiests get attached to their queens. 

Depending on how you run your hives , you can merge them together with newspaper and a queen excluder between the two queens . 

This will give you a two queen hive and if you let it run, you’ll get a good crop of honey , and the bees ‘may’ sort the hive out for you , back to one queen by next winter . 

 

The only downside I can see is that it may be too big and powerful for a beginner , so you’d have to be confident of what you were getting into 

 

Wait till you can confirm capped worker brood from your new queen before you do anything 

Edited by M4tt
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a double hive in auckland might be difficult.

i would just replace the old queen. the bees do it all the time. use the nuc as backup in case the requeen fails.

 

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@Suniti, In reality , I had trouble managing old queens when I started . As time goes by and you see in more beehives , you realise an old failing queen actually is a liability to the hive she once performed well in , and without a bit of beekeeper intervention , they go backwards pretty fast and can die out easily , 

 

Why did you feel you needed to requeen ?

 

The double queen hive isn’t for beginners . 

 

If there is nothing wrong with your old queen, then let her carry on and let your nuc build up to another hive if you think you can manage two . 

 

If if she is failing though , the inevitable decision needs to be made for the good of the hive as a whole 

 

Does that make sense ? 

Edited by M4tt
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11 hours ago, tristan said:

a double hive in auckland might be difficult.

 

Can you extend on this?

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9 hours ago, Qkrwogud said:

Can you extend on this?

double queens is not something i run.

however comments from others is that double queen hives in auckland can get very swarmy.

i know its often used down south. i suspect its about how the honey flow goes. auckland tends to be on/'off which really sets off swarming.

i'll take a guess that double queen allows for very quick build up be ready for a solid honey flow. bees tend to forget about swarming when they have a good honey flow on.

its also a bit complicated for beginners. a beginner trying to do a complicated method in a swarmy area is not really a good idea. there is simpler ways if you want to bank a spare queen.

 

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On 11/13/2017 at 4:45 PM, Suniti said:

This is my first year of bee keeping.I want to replace my queen(at least two years old). what is the best way to do it without killing her?

is this queen you want to replace marked with a coloured dot? the colour might help figure out how old she is

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