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DWV seen 3 months after Apivar came out


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7 minutes ago, Alastair said:

 

Don't do diagonal edges. Put the strips in the middle. Where the brood is. I have seen treatment fail completely because of this.

 

From the description, nest side of frame 4, and nest side of frame 7, that would mean only frames 5 and 6 are between the 2 strips? If so, that is OK for a brood nest of 6 frames. 

Oh Ok thanks, in the future I will make sure that all strips are positioned in the middle of brood nest frames rather than opposite edges.

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Most likely Old frames with too many large sized drone cells .   These need to be rotated out and replaced with better frames , either nicely drawn extracted frames or new frames .  Queens h

You do not need to specifically find the queen to do a sugar shake .  Just choose a frame with plenty of brood on it , preferably emerging , and give it a good look over to check that the queen i

It's a common issue with hobbyists, not placing strips correctly

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21 hours ago, M4tt said:

Get a a big plastic container , larger than the frame , so that when you shake the bees off , they all end up in the container and not on the ground . 

You can rotate the frame and shake it somewhere between upright and end-on to make the bees fall into a small container. Just don't go past end-on else grubs may fall out :/

 

21 hours ago, M4tt said:

Tip them into your sugar shaker , put on the lid and add a teaspoon of icing sugar .

I suggest putting the sugar in the jar before you add the bees. Then the time taken from jar full of bees to lid on can be kept the same each time. This helps maintain consistent sample size. Fluffing around with teaspoons and sugar adds variability as more or less bees escape the jar.

 

If you're putting the sugar through the mesh then time isn't an issue but putting it in first is easier.

 

I used to pour bees into the jar to a line but found that my sample size varied somewhat. Now I use a measuring cup and a dish with rounded sides. Tap the bees to one end of the dish. Hold the cup against the side then rotate to fill the cup. Cup to jar. Lid on. Quick and easy for a consistent sample size. Produces no crushed or grumpy bees. 

 

I really like your hot chocolate swirl and wait. I'm going to use that description in future :D

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If it's any consolation ..... we had a super doooper hive that came through he winter better than most and was used to strengthen weak hives in the yard. I had the queen earmarked togo up to Daykel Apiaries as a breeder. We went down two days ago to pop her in a queen cage and found the hive collapsing with varroa, despite having Apivar in for almost 9 weeks.

I called her a dumb critter, to be polite and chucked in some  O/A "shop towels" to 'see what would happen'. Science in Action.

 

 

 

 

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3 minutes ago, jamesc said:

We went down two days ago to pop her in a queen cage and found the hive collapsing with varroa, despite having Apivar in for almost 9 weeks.

It's a common issue with hobbyists, not placing strips correctly

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How do you arrange the Apivar when you split a hive .

The strips had been in  a double brood box for 6 weeks and I took a small nuc off and split the remaining hive .

I put a strip in with the nuc , two with the old queen and one in the box with cell .

Shortly after I combined the queen and cell box  but I am concerned about treatment levels.

I will give them an OA treatment too 

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What I do with splits is use one apivar to 4 frames of brood max. IE, 5 frames brood would get 2 strips. A lesser number of brood, right down to even zero, get's one strip, because even broodless bees can harbour mites and they'll start breeding soon as there is brood again.

 

At 6 weeks though, you could almost get away with less treatment, or no treatment at all. It's the spring nuc makers dilema, what to do when making splits from hives part way through treatment. My own view, if in doubt, more is better.

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24 minutes ago, Alastair said:

what to do when making splits from hives part way through treatment.

This is where OA strips come into their own

Just pile them in, they are as cheap as chips and if prepared correctly wont harm the hive

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2 hours ago, Philbee said:

This is where OA strips come into their own

Just pile them in, they are as cheap as chips and if prepared correctly wont harm the hive

 

Hi Philbee, 

 

Could it be harmful for a hive If  I were to xalic dribble and at the same time insert oxalic strips? 

The dribble to knock down mites and the strips for longer treatment. 

Would occur after requeen with cells in Feb- dribble when new queen on uncapped brood. 

 

Your thoughts/ideas would be appreciated. 

 

 

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3 hours ago, Philbee said:

This is where OA strips come into their own

Just pile them in, they are as cheap as chips and if prepared correctly wont harm the hive

is there a consensus yet on the best material and method for making OA strips.

i have been following the threads but have got a bit lost

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1 hour ago, Lindaloo26 said:

 

Hi Philbee, 

 

Could it be harmful for a hive If  I were to xalic dribble and at the same time insert oxalic strips? 

The dribble to knock down mites and the strips for longer treatment. 

Would occur after requeen with cells in Feb- dribble when new queen on uncapped brood. 

 

Your thoughts/ideas would be appreciated. 

 

 

I dont know.

In my operation I would try it and observe.

If the hive reacted adversely I would conclude that the method was probably risky.

My gut feeling is that the dribble plus strips could overload the hive in some circumstances

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 13.11.2017 г. at 12:11 AM, Valentine said:

Hi all. I treated my hive for Varroa in May of this year. They had DWV at the time, not too bad but around 5 emerged bees per day crawling on ground. Treatment came out after 10 weeks (early August). Mite count 0. Then only 3 months later and I can see 3-4 DWV pupae being removed per day for the last week and today I saw a newly emerged bee crawling on ground.

 

 

Assuming the hive has low varroa numbers. Then is a good idea to requeen with a more virus tolerant queen.

 

Nowadays is best if the varroa numbers are kept at low levels at all times. DWV can accumulate in the combs (and evolve. Every replication is inexact copy) to the point that ones varroa do it's job , it may no longer needs it to cause clinical symptoms. There already may be enough nosema and other opportunistic infections to cause crawling bees.

 

If a hive for some reason becomes too infested, I find it necessary to do nosema treatment alongside the varroa knockdown. 

 

The miticides are not a cure and should be applied only when necessary. They have an impact to the bee health as well. (Flumetrin and fluvalinate residues increase the DWV titers in non infested larvae) 

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8 hours ago, Scutellator said:

(Flumetrin and fluvalinate residues increase the DWV titers in non infested larvae) 

 

22 minutes ago, yesbut said:

Is this a bad thing ?

My very limited "Google" understanding is that "titer" is the measure of an antibody ?

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