Jump to content
jamesc

Manuka standards

Recommended Posts

49 minutes ago, frazzledfozzle said:

 

Nope not me !

DHA at that level has its own set of problems that those of us on our bush sites don’t have to worry about. 

What - how to spend all the money???

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, tom sayn said:

very impressive, @Merk

once i had readings like your first, but the dha of some of the others will make some beekeepers green with envy.

 

It's a good result for East Cape where I work but for northland/coromandel I understand that it's pretty commonplace. I was lucky to be in the manuka business before it was worth anything so got some good sites before the competition heated up. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Merk said:

It's a good result for East Cape where I work but for northland/coromandel I understand that it's pretty commonplace. I was lucky to be in the manuka business before it was worth anything so got some good sites before the competition heated up. 

Quality and potential price is good ..... how was your yield this year ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I havent tallied up the numbers and we're still harvesting but on the minooka I'd say something like 20kg/hive- not spectacular but the quality is there so I'm not complaining. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Philbee said:

Could it be that some of the teachers have very little experience with large scale Varroa control

my guess is that few teachers come from a beekeeping background. rather a teachers background with some basic beekeeping experience on a hobbyist level.

 

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Merk said:

It's a good result for East Cape where I work but for northland/coromandel I understand that it's pretty commonplace. I was lucky to be in the manuka business before it was worth anything so got some good sites before the competition heated up. 

far north can get readings like this (if they get a crop at all)

i doubt there is places on the coromandel that are that high, but maybe.

anything near a 1000 dha makes me cheer. but there is better turfs than mine.

i picked this spot for the people, the fishing and the coastline.

mind you as far as flavor goes, our honey is second to no one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What about the electric puha? I heard the coro strain is epic even better than te puke thunder

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i assume you are talking marijuana now, right? we are famous for that too, of cos.

i hear white rabbit is off the planet!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:2_grimacing:

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, tom sayn said:

my guess is that few teachers come from a beekeeping background. rather a teachers background with some basic beekeeping experience on a hobbyist level.

 

@tom sayn, it's more a case of the 'tutors' efforts are a thinly veiled sales presentation - they have 'special nucs' far superior to all others, as is any gear they supply at extortionate prices to the naive nubees. 

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Sailabee said:

@tom sayn, it's more a case of the 'tutors' efforts are a thinly veiled sales presentation - they have 'special nucs' far superior to all others, as is any gear they supply at extortionate prices to the naive nubees. 

 

Lol and of course if the nubee buys a nuc from anyone other than them they may have to burn the filthy thing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I pulled my honey half way through the kanuka flow and it still passed

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Maru Hoani said:

I pulled my honey half way through the kanuka flow and it still passed

 

I can't wait to see test results for my honey, just have to be patient and wait. 

We have a brand new extraction plant at work now so are flat tack spinning honey to get wet boxes back on hives with this extended flow. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What is the most cost effective way of testing honey.

before the Manuka standard we tested every batch for pollen count and depending on those results the odd batch would be tested for NPA.

do we keep it simple and do the same except swap out the NPA test forthe Manuka test or is their still a market for NPA honey which doesn’t pass the Manuka standard 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Stoney said:

I can't wait to see test results for my honey, just have to be patient and wait. 

We have a brand new extraction plant at work now so are flat tack spinning honey to get wet boxes back on hives with this extended flow. 

what sort of extractor ....?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, jamesc said:

what sort of extractor ....?

Not sure on the brand of it James think it was crystal tech that built for us 27 frame but will be a couple more go in down the track. 

Its a game changer for us. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Stoney said:

Not sure on the brand of it James think it was crystal tech that built for us 27 frame but will be a couple more go in down the track. 

Its a game changer for us. 

Aye for sure .... now masters of your own destiny !

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/4/2018 at 12:47 PM, tom sayn said:

my guess is that few teachers come from a beekeeping background. rather a teachers background with some basic beekeeping experience on a hobbyist level.

 

don't know what course that person had taken, I attended the ABC's beginner training and there was heaps of info about the varroa, from life cycle, effects, virus vectoring to treatments (organics as well) with horrifying magnified pictures of the beast. I would not blame my teachers, they are both beekeepers btw.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Gabor said:

don't know what course that person had taken, I attended the ABC's beginner training and there was heaps of info about the varroa, from life cycle, effects, virus vectoring to treatments (organics as well) with horrifying magnified pictures of the beast. I would not blame my teachers, they are both beekeepers btw.

So based on your learning, how do you manage Varroa?
Do you know what your current Varroa levels are and how do you check.

I would go as far as to say that even the green book is insufficient to properly equip a new Beek to beat Varroa.

 

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Philbee said:

So based on your learning, how do you manage Varroa?
Do you know what your current Varroa levels are and how do you check.

I would go as far as to say that even the green book is insufficient to properly equip a new Beek to beat Varroa.

 

alcohol wash + bayvarol will be applied for the autumn treatment (I've learned how to do a sugar shake from @M4tt tho)

don't know the current levels, I'll do next week.

all I was saying, not all courses are the same and the one I was attending, varroa has got into the spotlight amongst other pests and diseases. I usually just a quiet reader of the commercial section (for obvious reasons) but I felt that scentence needed that grain of salt. I am sorry if that was inappropriate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Gabor said:

alcohol wash + bayvarol will be applied for the autumn treatment (I've learned how to do a sugar shake from @M4tt tho)

don't know the current levels, I'll do next week.

all I was saying, not all courses are the same and the one I was attending, varroa has got into the spotlight amongst other pests and diseases. I usually just a quiet reader of the commercial section (for obvious reasons) but I felt that scentence needed that grain of salt. I am sorry if that was inappropriate.

No need to apologize for anything, thats not how things get done.

The issue is that AFB is easy, 

Easy to teach and easy to control

Its backed up by legislation, a nice little package that ticks all the boxes in a curriculum.
Varroa control on the other hand is very difficult and has no status in law.

A Teacher can learn AFB recognition in a one day course, quote from the green book on Varroa control and take your money thankyou very much.

There are a lot of Beeks who use the --------- treatment in the spring and the --------- treatment in the Autumn and have dead hives soon after.
Try getting one of these teachers to sort that out and you will see them totally at a loss.

 

   

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Philbee said:


Try getting one of these teachers to sort that out and you will see them totally at a loss.   

 

With all due respect I don't want anything from my teachers, except knowledge. I feel I gained a lot of it during the course. It seems you're holding grudges and now I'm not sure it's with beek teachers, the club or new/hobby beeks like me (or all). Whatever, this is getting a bit too condescending to me which is totally new tone for me here, so I walk now.

Have a lovely afternoon.

  • Like 1
  • Chill Out 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Gabor said:

 

With all due respect I don't want anything from my teachers, except knowledge. I feel I gained a lot of it during the course. It seems you're holding grudges and now I'm not sure it's with beek teachers, the club or new/hobby beeks like me (or all). Whatever, this is getting a bit too condescending to me which is totally new tone for me here, so I walk now.

Have a lovely afternoon.

HaHa ... I like that Gabor. "Have a lovely afternoon."

But in all seriousness, Philbee is right. Varroa is the enemy number one and to have nice looking bees come out of winter we need to get  our management and treatement  spot on right now.  Teachers of bee courses need to be pushing varroa control big time, not just the synthetics but  the other options, such as O/A, otherwise you end up with a whole heap of dead bees in the spring, which is great for people selling nucs etc, but pretty demoralising for those  starting up.

When we were selling nucs we just loved hobbyist's. We new they would be back next year for another nuc to restock the dead.

Any way, tomorrow is Waitangi day .... so let's take time out to reflect on how lucky we are to live in a country where we can, on the whole, live together in peace and harmony.

Have a great day !

  • Like 3
  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Stoney said:

Not sure on the brand of it James think it was crystal tech that built for us 27 frame but will be a couple more go in down the track. 

Its a game changer for us. 

buying in medium sized runs of honey to contract extract? or keeping everything in-house. Asking for a friend.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...