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Beehive placement


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We're moving in to town and I'd appreciate any advice on where you would put a pair of beehives and why.

The big trees are roughly to the north side of the section, satellite image shows the section with the top of the photo to the north.

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All moved in! Flight path over the feijoa tree to the right a bir, no disasters so far.  Now to build the second hive and split the existing one.  Nice to bee able to have morning coffee wit

I work my hives at home with no gear, while the kids next door lean on the fence about a metre away and watch me.. as long as you only open them in perfect weather and use smoke you won't have a

Figure out which neighbor you like the least and put them next to them....

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Put them on the fence line with entrance facing north/east... you will miss out on some late afternoon sun but will be the best option... you may still have a little problem with bee poo on your washing but fences and trees will force bees to fly up over your neighbour's so shouldn't be to much of a problem

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I'd put them against the brown wooden fence to the left of the satalite photo. The bees would fly up  and over the top of neighbours houses and they probably won't even know you have them. That location would get early morning sun and sun all day with some shade later in afternoon.

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The brown fence looks to back onto a right of way. I wouldn't put them there.

 

I'd put them centrally in the edge of the trees (preferred) or else centrally against the house. You can modify their flight path (and hide their presence) with wind netting.

 

Think about all the bee traffic when you work the hives mid summer. If you wouldn't have that in the middle of your back yard then why should the neighbour accept it on their boundary? If they're in the middle of your yard then you should be the first to notice if they're getting out of hand. 

 

Hastings DC bylaws are permissive of urban beekeeping but the onus is on the beekeeper to avoid causing a nuissance. Once any neighbour complains then your options are limited. Don't let a neighbour be the first one to notice that your bees are too strong.

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On 10/1/2017 at 9:59 PM, Rob Stockley said:

The brown fence looks to back onto a right of way. I wouldn't put them there.

 

I'd put them centrally in the edge of the trees (preferred) or else centrally against the house. You can modify their flight path (and hide their presence) with wind netting.

 

Think about all the bee traffic when you work the hives mid summer. If you wouldn't have that in the middle of your back yard then why should the neighbour accept it on their boundary? If they're in the middle of your yard then you should be the first to notice if they're getting out of hand. 

 

Hastings DC bylaws are permissive of urban beekeeping but the onus is on the beekeeper to avoid causing a nuissance. Once any neighbour complains then your options are limited. Don't let a neighbour be the first one to notice that your bees are too strong.

I work my hives at home with no gear, while the kids next door lean on the fence about a metre away and watch me..

as long as you only open them in perfect weather and use smoke you won't have a problem.

Or I do it when they're at school.

 

People will more likely get annoyed if you put them too close to someone's washing line.

 

If you give your neighbors honey they probably won't mind.

 

I'd still put them by the fence.. this is where they will be the least nuisance to everyone.

If you put them in the middle of the yard you'll have problems.

 

Mine used to face out into the yard. Big mistake, my dogs were getting stung constantly, and so was I.

Since I turned them to the fence no one gets stung, the lady directly over the fence had no idea they were there until I told her.

 

 

 

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Just now, Daley said:

I knew you said you had 2 hives at home ??

In napier there isnt a formal limit.... Theoretically I could have like 100 hives in my back yard as long as they dont piss anybody off.... but when the council bloke told me off for having 4 last time he said that he considered the limit to be 'two'.

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What’s the formal definition of a hive? 2 queen hives, top splits, nucs etc must lead to some wriggle room. Im sure that having 2 stacked vertically would fool most people (including me not that long ago). 

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Its got nothing to do with colony or hive numbers. Its got everything to do with avoiding a public nuissance.  What constitutes nuissance depends on the individual. One poorly placed or overly strong, swarmy hive could cause a nuissance.

 

So the options are either stay small and completely under the radar or work with your neighbours to ensure no one feels a victim. Pots of honey go a long way to reducing neighbourly friction in my experience. 

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