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Hello everybody, 


I am a French Warré hobbyist beekeeper and author of the Small Hive Project (www.smallhiveproject.eu)
This non-commercial project is about a small horizontal hive that I designed for backyard beekeeping. 


Starting from spring 2018, I will populate 4 copies of this hive and share my experience on the website. 

You may wish to participate in the project by building your own copy of the hive.

To do this, you may build it from scratch OR transform one of your Warré hives. Independent experimental data is necessary to evaluate the real potential of the hive design.

All necessary information is available on the project website.


New content will be added over the course of the project.
Stay tuned by subscrbing to the Newsletter on the website

 

The Hive has been designed to meet the following requirements: 
- favor bee colony survival in low-input beekeeping situations (no Varroa treatment, no sugar feeding). 
- adapted to rather small bee colonies of Apis Mellifera in environments dominated by agriculture (moderate nectar flow). 
- suitable for comb honey production (Low productivity is acceptable, as long as sufficient for personal use.) easy to build and to manage. 

 

Hive plans and more information are available on the website. 

Feel free to comment the project.

Thank you! 

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10 hours ago, smallhiveproject said:

Hive plans and more information are available on the website. 

Feel free to comment the project.

Thank you! 

Hi and welcome to NZBees. Swarming is discouraged in New Zealand. Most hobbyists are in urban areas and swarms are considered a public nuissance. I think we would struggle to manage a colony here in such a small hive. 

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49 minutes ago, Rob Stockley said:

I think we would struggle to manage a colony here in such a small hive. 

Ah, that's just it Rob, there is no management. You fill it with bees, and when they die, you empty it out and fill it with more.

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Best I can tell it's a cube measuring approx 12 inches by 12 inches by 11 inches.

 

When people used to talk feet and inches it was a beekeepers rule of thumb that to collect a swarm and have it stay in the collection box, the box had to be not less than a cubic foot.

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18 hours ago, smallhiveproject said:

no Varroa treatment,

Why would you advocate that.

The hive will die

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leaving your hive to die is simply not beekeeping!

making a hive smaller to fit the bees because the bees are diseased and dieing, is stupid.

spreading disease all around the neighborhood is irresponsible. 

 

simply put, your claim that the warre hive was to big is in error. all thats happened is your bee colony is to small due to it being diseased.

fix the real problem and not try and hide it with some new hive design.

 

:(

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On 9/24/2017 at 10:45 PM, smallhiveproject said:

Feel free to comment the project.

 

as suggested, i feel free.

 

your idea is terrible. Have you ever successfully kept bees?

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8 minutes ago, smallhiveproject said:

Essential for treatment-free beekeeping

I don't know how you know this you haven't managed to keep any yet have you ?

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Thanks for sharing with this forum even though the responses are dismissive (and probably rightly so).

 

There is one valid point you make - increasing the distance between hives can reduce drift and varroa infestation from drift.  In a practical sense this can be tricky with hives on pallets and apiary area sometimes being limited.

 

As for the other ideas...it seems a small hive is really only a normal hive that has been poorly managed.

 

 

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Very complicated hive. And it is illegal to have fixed frame hives in NZ.  Otherwise it will be interesting  to see how Seeley's small hive theory works in practice.

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On 14/01/2018 at 5:41 AM, Sasha said:

And it is illegal to have fixed frame hives in NZ. 


SmallHiveProject encourages the respect of local apiary laws. 
If movable frames are legaly required in your region, the fixed-frame hive body could be made up entirely by fully movable Huber leaf frames.

This is clearly stated on the project website: http://www.smallhiveproject.eu/?concept.html
Edited by smallhiveproject

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RE-Call for participation!
Refer to the project website for all necessary information (videos, plans ...)

Feel free to contact the publisher for any question or advice.

 

First results overviewis online at http://www.smallhiveproject.eu/?results.html

Edited by smallhiveproject

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