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Most of us would be doing observations and taking notes whether mental or written every time we open a hive so maybe we all have thousands of hive years under our belts :) 

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I think the definition, is that hives with staples in owned by Phil, combined with other peoples hives like Stoney where staples are working well, count as hive years.

 

Hives owned by anyone else, especially people who used staples but the staples got a bad result, do not count as hive years. Their score ='s zero. 😉

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1 hour ago, Alastair said:

I think the definition, is that hives with staples in owned by Phil, combined with other peoples hives like Stoney where staples are working well, count as hive years.

 

Hives owned by anyone else, especially people who used staples but the staples got a bad result, do not count as hive years. Their score ='s zero. 😉

 

You may be right about a lack of flow causing issues.

For me at least the weather up here through Sept and Oct was so cold and windy, that the hives have been held back.  I was in at a site last week in the Taupaki area and I'd treated it with Bayverol in early Spring and it is still miles behind where it would have been last year.  Is that your general observation as well?  Also if you have treated a site with Bayverol and Ox/G what sort of difference in bee numbers are you seeing?  eg 10 frames v 15 frames

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The difference I'm seeing at this time is one box of bees or less for staple treated hives (except for a few notable exceptions), and 3 boxes of bees for bayvarol treated hives. Yes weather has been lousy, but my bayvarol treated hives are about where they would always be at this time.

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hmmm, I wonder if very hungry/starving bees could turn on to the OAG strips as a food source with resulting mortality?

I've read but never seen that bees will even canabalise their own brood as a matter of survival; there is no use for brood if everyone else is already starved to death..

If as some say the hives get knocked back first time around and then subsequent times do really well, it could be that many hives try eating them experimentally first time around and then conclude never to eat/digest them again. Bees do dumb things too, but they're smart.

Is it possible some of the OAG hives took down all the early spring syrup and hit a dry spot in between feeding rounds? If so it may mean that feeding/stores are much more important for OAG hives so that the treatment is not used in an unintended manner.

Sorry if this is something someone else already said in one thread or other.

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2 hours ago, ChrisM said:

hmmm, I wonder if very hungry/starving bees could turn on to the OAG strips as a food source with resulting mortality?

I've read but never seen that bees will even canabalise their own brood as a matter of survival; there is no use for brood if everyone else is already starved to death..

If as some say the hives get knocked back first time around and then subsequent times do really well, it could be that many hives try eating them experimentally first time around and then conclude never to eat/digest them again. Bees do dumb things too, but they're smart.

Is it possible some of the OAG hives took down all the early spring syrup and hit a dry spot in between feeding rounds? If so it may mean that feeding/stores are much more important for OAG hives so that the treatment is not used in an unintended manner.

Sorry if this is something someone else already said in one thread or other.

Agree, bees do eat the acid. They must also eat some when you apply the dribble treatment. I have noticed a few dead bees after dribbling. 

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Once upon a time , I read that OA in syrup was a good cure for Nosema.

At the time , I tried it on my observation hive as they were low on population and looked like they needed a boost . They were well used to being fed syrup little and often via an upturned jam jar .

They literally wolfed down the first third of the jar, and wouldn’t touch it after that .

Further to that , they wouldn’t touch fresh syrup either . They learn for sure .

I can’t remember what the brood did though 

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If I thought I could use  tau fluvalinate indefinitely I probably would .

But things do become resistant to it .

Some types of spider mites in commercial tunnel houses are becoming difficult to control with it now .

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