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Boyesee

NZBF Varroa control

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I have just put in varroa treatment to my hive and put some corflute underneath to see how many mites dropped off. (Picture attached)

 

It looks like a lot? I also noticed 3-4 bees which were very pale looking and only had partial wings as well as 2-3 which were partially out of a cell but dead. 

 

Does this his look like a serious load of varroa. Is there anything else I should do. There is still plenty of honey frames and plenty of activity with bees collecting pollen. 

IMG_0881.JPG

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Bayvarol has a fast initial knockdown. So large mite fall in the first 48hrs is normal. 

 

It will take several brood cycles before you stop seeing bees with deformed wing virus. 

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It's a reasonably normal looking mite drop for a treatment at this time of year. Depending how many bees in the hive.

 

But the symptoms you describe are serious, once it gets to bees dying half way out of the cell you have a heavy mite and virus level and survival of the hive is in question.

 

Just be sure the bayvarol strips are correctly placed, ie, among the brood, not on the edge of it as I see some people do. The brood nest can shrink or move during treatment time, so for a hive in this condition it is a good idea to check 3 weeks into the treatment, and move the strips if need be.

Edited by Alastair
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6 minutes ago, Alastair said:

It's a reasonably normal looking mite drop for a treatment at this time of year. Depending how many bees in the hive.

 

But the symptoms you describe are serious, once it gets to bees dying half way out of the cell you have a heavy mite and virus level and survival of the hive is in question.

 

Just be sure the bayvarol strips are correctly placed, ie, among the brood, not on the edge of it as I see some people do. The brood nest can shrink or move during treatment time, so for a hive in this condition it is a good idea to check 3 weeks into the treatment, and move the strips if need be.

ok thanks - the number of bees has definitely decreased. Brood was in the middle frames so put the strips towards the middle where the most bees were clustered.

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Depending on how treatment goes should I consider requeening and if so when?

 

I set my hive up in October last year from a swarm I caught. It is currently 2 brood boxes.

 

 

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OK. The strips must be among the brood. IE, if you have a 10 frame brood box and E ='s frame with no brood, B ='s frame with brood, and s ="s strip, let's say you have 4 frames of brood in the middle, the strips should be placed EEEsBsBsBsBEEE. And the strips should be placed in the middle of each frame, or brood area of that frame, not at the end of the frame.

 

And since the brood area is shrinking you definately have a problem, very important to do that 3 week check & re position strips if needed.

 

As to requeening, once the hive is recovering, see if you think the queen is doing a good job, if so, keep it. But if you decide to requeen don't spend any money till you know if the hive is actually going to make it. If the hive is still alive & looking reasonable at the 3 week check, it will make it long as treatment is continued the full period.

Edited by Alastair
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14 minutes ago, Alastair said:

OK. The strips must be among the brood. IE, if you have a 10 frame brood box and E ='s frame with no brood, B ='s frame with brood, and s ="s strip, let's say you have 4 frames of brood in the middle, the strips should be placed EEEsBsBsBsBEEE. And the strips should be placed in the middle of each frame, or brood area of that frame, not at the end of the frame.

 

And since the brood area is shrinking you definately have a problem, very important to do that 3 week check & re position strips if needed.

 

As to requeening, once the hive is recovering, see if you think the queen is doing a good job, if so, keep it. But if you decide to requeen don't spend any money till you know if the hive is actually going to make it. If the hive is still alive & looking reasonable at the 3 week check, it will make it long as treatment is continued the full period.

ok thanks

 

I actually put them in EEEBssBBssBEEE ok? or worth repositioning

 

I will definitely recheck in 3 weeks

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Better if you can, to move one of those strips to the very middle. The reason is that with a potentially shrinking brood nest you want to cover all the bases, one of those bases being that the outer 2 brood frames will cease to function and the strips are giving poor coverage to what's left. One strip smack in the middle can be very useful if that scenario happens.

 

Some people think I'm pretty anal about strip placement, but I see a lot of hives, and have seen so many hives die or nearly die, despite being treated, due to poor strip placement.

 

Edited by Alastair
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2 hours ago, Boyesee said:

bayvarol. I used apistan at end of summer

This is effectively using the same treatments twice in a row. If the autumn treatment was apistan then spring treatment should be apivar or some other class if treatment.

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