Jump to content
MissEmmz

What are bees foraging on at present

Recommended Posts

Mine were all over the neighbours Chinese lanterns and hollyhocks today.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, tommy dave said:

bees all over ivy and rosemary. Still plenty of fresh nectar in the hives. Debating whether to leave them an empty super.

That’s sounds positive 😊

14 hours ago, Sowannabee said:

Mine were all over the neighbours Chinese lanterns and hollyhocks today.

My hollyhocks won’t even bloom this year....

19 hours ago, john berry said:

Koromiko causes the gut line in bee pupae to change from the normal yellowish to purple. In large quantities it can make the whole pupa purple and the capped brood will look very dark, a bit like the early stages of AFB. Very occasionally I have seen cause mortality and this has been recorded by other people as well. I think overall it does a lot more good than harm. I saw a lot of discoloured brood in late February this year but no mortality. My brother and I named the condition purple death after a wine that was popular when we were young (not with us).

Yes it would be easy to put your panic pants on if you saw purple pupa and dark brood for the first time. 😳This forum is gold.

I wonder what the biochemistry is. 

That’s really useful for a new Beek to know thank you @john berry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Update on the lavender patch 

7D98B41F-0DDC-4190-BA9B-BE754F70CA26.thumb.jpeg.dbb3ea5a49eaf1e1b5f9744bada2fb8c.jpeg

 

We’ve been mulching and weeding. The plants are surviving the dry conditions. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Took sugar to a site today that around a month ago i took all honey off down to the bottom box and put an empty super on each hive to give the bees somewhere to fit in. 

 

So I was expecting the now 2 box hives to be in serious need of a feed, instead I'm trying to prise off the well glued down mats and find the boxes absolutely chocablock. No idea what this honey is or where it came from but i like this site. 🙂

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, Alastair said:

No idea what this honey is or where it came from but i like this site. 🙂

Dare I ask then, an implication of this is that you have a home for all your honey ?

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right now the honey is in the tank but the money is not in the bank LOL.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/03/2019 at 8:11 AM, Trevor Gillbanks said:

It is a pretty cool app.  I used it on the screen of your photo to get that result.  Pretty impressive I think.

 

 

It requires IOS 10. I can not wait to get a Samsung or Huawei.

 

On 25/03/2019 at 5:48 PM, Alastair said:

Took sugar to a site today that around a month ago i took all honey off down to the bottom box and put an empty super on each hive to give the bees somewhere to fit in. 

 

So I was expecting the now 2 box hives to be in serious need of a feed, instead I'm trying to prise off the well glued down mats and find the boxes absolutely chocablock. No idea what this honey is or where it came from but i like this site. 🙂

 

Cool, we are coming. :D

I have seen for the past few weeks flowering the bottle brush. Not so intense like in December however it is really on. Very strange.

  • Haha 1
  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Purple Tansy (Phacelia).

I researched what to plant in our garden for bees.  Sunflower, seemed useless, just bumble bees.   Marigold > useless.  Lavender, ok they attracted a few bees.  Clover was good but not at first. Then I planted purple tansy seeds after hearing about them from Philbee .. the bees have gone insane on them, they've been foraging from dawn til after dusk every day.  

tansies.jpg

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And I planted Phacelia under all my apple trees and the codlin moth problem has dropped by 85%.  I get heaps of apples with no trails thru them at all something that has not happened during the previous seasons.  

  • Like 2
  • Good Info 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, Paul Beer said:

Purple Tansy (Phacelia).

I researched what to plant in our garden for bees.  Sunflower, seemed useless, just bumble bees.   Marigold > useless.  Lavender, ok they attracted a few bees.  Clover was good but not at first. Then I planted purple tansy seeds after hearing about them from Philbee .. the bees have gone insane on them, they've been foraging from dawn til after dusk every day.  

And encourages your Q to keep on laying, then a frost comes along....?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, yesbut said:

And encourages your Q to keep on laying, then a frost comes along....?

 

The Winter feeding question is an interesting one.  I've not done it before, not wanting to burn the bees out, and taking onboard the comments of some of the v experienced bk's to not do it.  Then if you follow something like @dansar's successful nuc feeding and build-up regime from June 1st (last season I think) it makes me wonder....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, CraBee said:

Then if you follow something like @dansar's successful nuc feeding and build-up regime from June 1st (last season I think) it makes me wonder....

Dan just can't help himself. Rods for his own back and all that

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My personal feeling is that you shouldn't stimulate hives in winter unless you have a good reason for doing so. I don't, so I don't.

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, john berry said:

My personal feeling is that you shouldn't stimulate hives in winter unless you have a good reason for doing so. I don't, so I don't.

How do you keep them off any local winter flow .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, yesbut said:

And encourages your Q to keep on laying, then a frost comes along....?

Those bees of yours must be a bit soft. A bit of frost doesn’t slow down our CNI bees. 🤣

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, dansar said:

Those bees of yours must be a bit soft. A bit of frost doesn’t slow down our CNI bees. 🤣

I was thinking the Phaecilia might get frosted...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, yesbut said:

I was thinking the Phaecilia might get frosted...

Interestingly the frost down to minus 5  doesn’t affect Phacelia at all at least here.  The tops of the plant gets a slightly bronze tinge but it keeps right on growing and flowering right thru the life of the plant.  The seeds just keep germinating summer and winter regardless of the temp or the water supply.  It’s an amazing plant considering it has soft juicy stems.  Must be full of antifreeze.

  • Like 2
  • Good Info 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Oma said:

Interestingly the frost down to minus 5  doesn’t affect Phacelia at all at least here.  The tops of the plant gets a slightly bronze tinge but it keeps right on growing and flowering right thru the life of the plant.  The seeds just keep germinating summer and winter regardless of the temp or the water supply.  It’s an amazing plant considering it has soft juicy stems.  Must be full of antifreeze.

Hi @Oma a couple of questions, do you have it where cattle can eat it and do they.  and how many plants do you have near you apple trees, a few or lots?  I have apple trees with codlin moth and huge old pear trees that are prolific fruiters but heaps of moth.  Thanks in advance

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Question. Some hives i checked had a lot of new honey so i dunked my hive tool in and sampled probably a teaspoonful, wow it tasted horrible. And I mean so bad, it was aweful, tasted like something really badly rotten. 

 

Kinda freaked, i thought maybe this is tutin, i grabbed some water and thoroughly washed my mouth out but had already swallowed some. But, nothing happened, so, guess it wasn't tutin.

 

I have never experiennced anything like this in my life before, ever. It was a lightish coloured honey, gathered by the bees in the last few weeks, curious if anyone knows what it may have been? BTW i have tasted willowdew, not a nice honey in my opinion. But this was a whole several levels worse, really nasty.

 

 

Edited by Alastair
  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like Rata to me

  • Haha 1
  • Spoon 1
  • Disagree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Buckwheat ...?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Alastair said:

it tasted horrible. And I mean so bad, it was aweful, tasted like something really badly rotten.

 

could the bees have been collecting juice from rotting fruit or vegetables?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, tommy dave said:

could the bees have been collecting juice from rotting fruit or vegetables?

Till yesterday I had 30 odd hives at my house site.  They have been right into fallen pears apples, peaches etc that are split and starting to ferment.

Now the hives are gone those fruit have lots of flies and some wasps, till the cattle get them that it.

My opinion could easily be fallen rotting fruit.

 I had one land owner saying our hives were robbing her peach tree about a month ago.

.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, yesbut said:

Sounds like Rata to me

 

Honey Dew?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, fieldbee said:

Hi @Oma a couple of questions, do you have it where cattle can eat it and do they.  and how many plants do you have near you apple trees, a few or lots?  I have apple trees with codlin moth and huge old pear trees that are prolific fruiters but heaps of moth.  Thanks in advance

Unfortunately @fieldbee I understand Phacelia is part of a herbal key that cattle can eat, but  if there are other choices they might leave the Phacelia alone.  I have cleared an area around each tree probably 1mt around the trunk and distributed seeds, now the plants are self sown and tend to crowd out other weeds.  I think Phacelia interferes with the life cycle preventing codlin moth establishing in the soil under the trees.  I have a couple of Quince trees and 3 peach trees with fruit damaging brown rot fungus, I have planted mustard seed under these this season.  There has been some improvement in the fruit at least they ripened this year before the rot set in. Other years the fruit rotted while it was still green. I will continue with the mustard for a few more seasons will be great if it works.  The bees enjoy the flowers too.

  • Good Info 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...