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What are bees foraging on at present


MissEmmz

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52 minutes ago, mischief said:

Apple tree just started flowering and bees on it already, same with the espaliered garden belle Pear.

Does any one else keep wild flowers going just for the bees?

Yes ....  I planted a wisteria on the work shop wall many years ago ..... it was a runner from on old mate's garden  in Lytellton who has been  quite dead now  for about eight years .... this is the first year it has flowered. I often wonder about the dirt out the front of the workshop.It used to be the shearing shed and nothing really seems to thrive when planted.  Last year the big Oregon went brown and died. I am wondering if it is toxic with dip residue .... even though have been out of use for over twenty years. 

Edited by jamesc
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11 hours ago, jamesc said:

Yes ....  I planted a wisteria on the work shop wall many years ago ..... it was a runner from on old mate's garden  in Lytellton who has been  quite dead now  for about eight years .... this is the first year it has flowered. I often wonder about the dirt out the front of the workshop.It used to be the shearing shed and nothing really seems to thrive when planted.  Last year the big Oregon went brown and died. I am wondering if it is toxic with dip residue .... even though have been out of use for over twenty years. 

If it was where they used to shear the sheep, it probably isnt due to the toxic dip cos sheep are dry when they are shorn.

Its more like to be because its impacted soil. that doesnt explain the tree dying though. That could be due to just being old or insect infestation/disease. If the tree lived so long it wont have been due to the dip after all that time.

If you want to get this area planted out and healthy, you'll need to work out what exactly is wrong with the area and go from there. Areas that havent been allowed to grow things will be seriously depleted in soil microbes and worms, so it will need small and often feeding.

Impacted soil needs loosening and probably heavy mulching with something like compost to help shallow rooting plants get started. Once they are going okay and you have things like worms moving in, you'll probably find that more deeper rooting plants will grow a bit better.

You'll also find that little and often watering at the plants roots will work better than heavy sprinkler type watering and mulching with loose mulch will help with evaporation

 

Edited by mischief
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Already have stone fruit set. What's the dealio on keeping weka or tuatara? Gave up on the chihuahua idea after seeing a tea-cup one. Would need to spend a lot of time in my pocket. the original shaking dog. Looking into surveillance cameras as last year there was some ne'er-do-well taking the lot. Police reckoned I could report it. Just wondering what team would turn up if I report "My peach has been stripped". 

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9 hours ago, Jean MacDonald said:

Already have stone fruit set. What's the dealio on keeping weka or tuatara? Gave up on the chihuahua idea after seeing a tea-cup one. Would need to spend a lot of time in my pocket. the original shaking dog. Looking into surveillance cameras as last year there was some ne'er-do-well taking the lot. Police reckoned I could report it. Just wondering what team would turn up if I report "My peach has been stripped". 

Was it a human stealing your peaches ?

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5 hours ago, kaihoka said:

Was it a human stealing your peaches ?

I live in an area where the homeless of Wellington have been gravitating too. Mature fruit trees that I planted while being told I was an idiot for doing so as there was aways fruit at the shops. I objected to the entire tree being stripped leaving me nothing and was unable to call the local team of fruit pickers to supply the local food banks. Good fruit trees I selected for cross pollination and maximum yeild. Was concerned back then that things wouldn't always be "peaches and cream" and we now have a burgeoning population of homeless people. For that particular tree I don't think it was homeless people but more of an opportunist. Was done overnight as went out the next morning with a bowl to collect for our use and every fruit was gone. It was laden the afternoon before. Think you need a special permit for native wildlife and I doubt they would approve of guard wekas.

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4 hours ago, Jean MacDonald said:

I live in an area where the homeless of Wellington have been gravitating too. Mature fruit trees that I planted while being told I was an idiot for doing so as there was aways fruit at the shops. I objected to the entire tree being stripped leaving me nothing and was unable to call the local team of fruit pickers to supply the local food banks. Good fruit trees I selected for cross pollination and maximum yeild. Was concerned back then that things wouldn't always be "peaches and cream" and we now have a burgeoning population of homeless people. For that particular tree I don't think it was homeless people but more of an opportunist. Was done overnight as went out the next morning with a bowl to collect for our use and every fruit was gone. It was laden the afternoon before. Think you need a special permit for native wildlife and I doubt they would approve of guard wekas.

I would be so pissed off .

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3 hours ago, kaihoka said:

I would be so pissed off .

There were some expletives muttered. I understand hunger but this was greed. People are surprised what I can produce but perhaps they should read a book on the subject instead of trusting an article or opinion in some magazine. Always surprises me how little people know about what they purport to be experts at. Glaring inaccuracies of the ilk of a quite well written article in Readers Digest 30+ years ago about bees with a picture of a drone fly on the front cover. My dad kept it and would take it out every so often and chortle to himself and we would get to listen to the story all over again. 15 years ago there was an absolute dearth of honey bees in town but we would observe the others including the now infamous drone fly and discuss food security etc. Crops always good in my garden but a chap in a village nearby had such a poor yield on his beans it was written up in the local rag. Perhaps if people didn't spray everything they'd be surprised... mind you there are some signs of new interlopers. 4 months of poor border control in the wee small hours of our morning because of industrial action. May pay to keep a weather eye out for the new and unusual.

 

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Went for a walk along the waterfront in napier today, lots flowering including echiums, bottlebrush, an overeager pohutukawa, pink tea tree, orange flower and a tonne of annuals like poppies and stock etc.... didn't see a bee on any of them. My girls at home are in the macadamia tree at the moment. 

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Mine are still all over the brassicas 

My Spring flowering Koromiko is bouncing with bees and after a week of flowering, my Apple tree is loaded too.

The Avocado is just starting to flower, funnily enough the bottom flower are starting first this year and already getting visitors.

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There is a large rewarewa a few doors down the street and I'd say half my bees are working that one tree.

My Apple looks stunning full of blossom and bees, as are the cherry blossoms down our street. Everything seems to be in bloom and the bees are spoiled for choice. Already a box of honey nearly capped on one hive.

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Oh no! The kowhai trees around here are alive with foraging bees today, haven’t seen anything untoward at my hive entrances thankfully.  The broom is full of flowers for miles around as well so maybe diluting the kowhai nectar?

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23 minutes ago, Oma said:

Oh no! The kowhai trees around here are alive with foraging bees today, haven’t seen anything untoward at my hive entrances thankfully.  The broom is full of flowers for miles around as well so maybe diluting the kowhai nectar?

My kowhai tree gets defoliated by the pigeons .

I am surprised its still alive .

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33 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

My kowhai tree gets defoliated by the pigeons .

I am surprised its still alive .

 

The pigeons started on ours too but have shifted focus to the developing plums on everyone’s trees round here

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7 hours ago, Oma said:

 

The pigeons started on ours too but have shifted focus to the developing plums on everyone’s trees round here

For 30 yrs the pigeons destroyed my plum trees here and I gave up growing them .

About 5 yrs ago the tuis moved in and kept the pigeons under control and they  do not touch the plums .

the pigeons have however killed a magnolia and now  have discovered the  pears .

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