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Tony Greathead

NZBF non waxed frames?

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Hello,

 

Has anyone used a super of non waxed frames?

 

Are the bees happy enough drawing them out without them been pre-waxed before hand? Or is it just a "no, dont do it"

 

Thanks.

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Hello,

 

Has anyone used a super of non waxed frames?

 

Are the bees happy enough drawing them out without them been pre-waxed before hand? Or is it just a "no, dont do it"

 

Thanks.

Bees really don't care

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IMG_0366.JPG.529fdc4d2f28908a672ca0905fb561b6.JPG

IMG_0366.JPG.529fdc4d2f28908a672ca0905fb561b6.JPG

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The frames need to be waxed to work, otherwise the bees wont have anything to build on

As usual there's an awesome video by @Trevor Gillbanks

at [media]

[/media] Edited by Guest
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They will, if you must, on a good flow but...much better to wax. And, yes, we have done it, a long time ago when we, and the bees, we're desperate to get supers on.

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By accident we've put out unwaxed frames. I've made sure NEVER to do it a second time.

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By accident we've put out unwaxed frames. I've made sure NEVER to do it a second time.

What did they do ?

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I tried a couple of poorly waxed frames once. The bees got very creative with freeform building.

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What did they do ?

For me they build neat new combs up between the frames leaving the frames perfectly clean...

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For me they build neat new combs up between the frames leaving the frames perfectly clean...

Mine were not so neat, they were lovely loopy things but yes, the frames stayed clean.

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Yeah I've done it when desperate to get some frames in and the bees built them out fine. But only two or three new frames in a box.

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Better yet is what Dansar did, but with a frame or two of straight, built out combs in with the foundationless to guide the bees.

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If during a good honey flow you put just one frame between 2 good drawn frames the bees will draw it just fine.

If the flow is patchy or slow and you put in multiple frames together the results will be less than ideal.

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@kaihoka, they made their own comb, built out from the plastic with space in between, stuff got ugly!
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Hello,

 

Has anyone used a super of non waxed frames?

 

Are the bees happy enough drawing them out without them been pre-waxed before hand? Or is it just a "no, dont do it"

 

Thanks.

If you ask me, no don't do it lol.

Because you'll just end up making more work for yourself and the bees.

They really don't like it, and you'll be lucky if they draw the comb on the frame if its unwaxed.

We had about 20 rogue boxes out unwaxed that someone grabbed off the wrong stack, and they were a pain in the bum until we found them all and got them back in and waxed them, the bees hated them, if they drew any comb in them at all it wasn't pretty.

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I put out unwaxed frames on occasion and it works fine if you have the right conditions. I use whole supers of new unwaxed frames all the same so they can't work on "preferred" frames but just have to start drawing. Preferably 11 frames to a box (33mm end bars) jammed in so there are no big gaps between frames. Put it on immediately above a strong brood box in a strong hive, no queen excluder. With a good population of bees in a strong flow they'll draw them out real nice.

 

I haven't got good results with alternating unwaxed with waxed.

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I'm not sure if it is a related question but here goes.

I have been thinking of building a couple of swarm traps this year and have been carrying out some research, I noticed that in UTube clips I have watched that bare wooden frames ie. no foundation or wiring were used, is this correct and the reason please? I am still in my first year of beekeeping and started with a package of kit so have only owned and used plastic frames so far.

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I'm not sure if it is a related question but here goes.

I have been thinking of building a couple of swarm traps this year and have been carrying out some research, I noticed that in UTube clips I have watched that bare wooden frames ie. no foundation or wiring were used, is this correct and the reason please? I am still in my first year of beekeeping and started with a package of kit so have only owned and used plastic frames so far.

 

If making a LOT of swarm boxes, it will be cheaper and more cost effective to go foundationless. Also swarms arrive fully set up to draw comb so they'll do it effortlessly with bees already selected for that purpose. But still if you had some empty, dry, fully drawn comb spare you could make use of it. If you had frames of foundation laying about spare, well that's fine too.

 

Unless you have a 'proven lucky tree' like Dansar does, it is probably worth putting more effort into swarm collector lists, local bee club, local district council, power board, demolition yard etc and general PR so people know to call YOU when they have a swarm in the vicinity. In that case a double bucket system and some boxes set up to house swarms in a swarm apiary is probably a better investment of your time. Swarm boxes are a little bit like lotto tickets, whereas a phone call about a swarm that needs collecting is a near certainty (unless it is wasps, so you only need to ask if the 'bees' are living in the ground). That should cover 80% of it.

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@DuncanCook Have a good read thru the forum. Last year there was much discussion on swarm management but as is the way, often not in a thread with 'swarm management' as its title- so I cant easily supply you a list of threads to read.

briefly, the idea is for swarms to be housed on foundation, as it makes them use up the carried stores in making wax, therefore if they carried AFB spores, they were not fed to the young.

The difference perhaps between a swarm trap and housing a swarm.

Good luck.

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