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HSV_Darren

Pollination question

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Im guessing there are a few beekeepers here that know a thing or two about pollination, therefore for I have a question,

I'm wanting to plant a few fruit trees at my apiary site in Featherston, a lot of trees I'm looking at such as plum, apple, feijoa, say that I should have two different varieties for pollination, I don't have enough suitable space for two of each tree,

So my question is, do I need two varieties of the same tree for ideal polination or will my 3 hives do the same job pollinating the trees? Cheers

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Some trees are self pollinating, others require a pollinator of a different type , and others are male and female .

You'll need to talk to your friendly supplier. Often , the required pollinator is written on the label

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Peaches are often self fertile

Plums like company

Pears can be pollinated by Nashi

Some varieties of Apple's will pollinate a range of Apple's .

Feijoas needs birds not bees.

You can buy triple grafted trees but sometimes one variety will dominate and there is very uneven growth.

Fruit trees are not that interesting to bees and the best results for pollination are when you move a hive into a flowering orchard.

The bees will attend to the blossom while they look around for something better.

If a hive lives there all the time the bees often have found that something better .

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If you are in town the don't worry. Usually someone else has the required pollinator. Try and purchase self pollinating varieties

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With plum trees they graft a pollinator on to it, I don't know about apples etc.

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fiejoa can be self fertile or not depending on variety and apples are the same. My fruit trees are generally very sought after by my bees and the wild plums which are the 1st to flower can look like the bees are swarming. Personally I wouldn't plant apples unless you want to do a lot of spraying. Pears usually need a pollinator but they are not so spray dependent. Peaches need a lot of fungicides while plums generally produce a crop even without much TLC.

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I decided to get two plum trees, one omega and one black Doris which are my two favourite plums, I hope the wild pigs leave them alone! Thanks for the info on polination.

 

I got given two feijoa trees when I moved into my house, they never had any fruit for about 6 years, just the odd spindly couple that fell off early, last year I pruned the life out of them both and they quickly grew new shoot and this year I had a few hundred perfect feijoas!

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last year I pruned the life out of them both and they quickly grew new shoot and this year I had a few hundred perfect feijoas!

Yup, just like wives, they perform better with a regular beating.

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A really good self fertile plum is called Hawera. Produces large red fleshed fruit. A really good self fertile pear is called Kieffer. I have both in my garden.

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A really good self fertile plum is called Hawera. Produces large red fleshed fruit. A really good self fertile pear is called Kieffer. I have both in my garden.

Is the pear a biannual fruit bearer

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Is the pear a biannual fruit bearer

My one produces every year.

Edited by Guest

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A really good self fertile plum is called Hawera

I ended up cutting our Hawera down. Of our five varieties, Hawera was the most irresistable to possums, we just couldn't trap or shoot them enough to stop the tree getting stuffed. They have a go at all the others, but they don't seem drawn to them as strongly.

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I ended up cutting our Hawera down. Of our five varieties, Hawera was the most irresistable to possums, we just couldn't trap or shoot them enough to stop the tree getting stuffed. They have a go at all the others, but they don't seem drawn to them as strongly.

Do you have many possums still.?

Has there been any control programs in your area ?

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A lot of hand baiting was done about 10 years ago, possums became a rarity. now they're building up again.

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A lot of hand baiting was done about 10 years ago, possums became a rarity. now they're building up again.

I was fortunate here that when I was really hard out at controlling possums there are no wekas so I did not need raised sets.

Also I had no cats so I could use kill traps .

Also being on a peninsula ('the top end of the north western south island ) they can only come back from the South which is heavily controlled because of TB

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When do blueberry farms need hives for pollination?

Edited by Kiwi Bee
to add more info

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8 hours ago, Kiwi Bee said:

When do blueberry farms need hives for pollination?

The earliest varieties start the end of August if not a bit before .

Later ones are finishing October sometime so it’s quite a long window .

The bees go nuts over them

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Thank you @M4tt. This is a very good news.

I have not spoken with the farmer yet and I do not know what variety of blueberry he has(someone recommended me to him).

 

Does anybody know how many hives are needed per acre?

Are single hives good enough or they must be doubles?

And what will be a fair price to charge per hive + gst? For singles or doubles?

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1 hour ago, Kiwi Bee said:

Thank you @M4tt. This is a very good news.

I have not spoken with the farmer yet and I do not know what variety of blueberry he has(someone recommended me to him).

 

Does anybody know how many hives are needed per acre?

Are single hives good enough or they must be doubles?

And what will be a fair price to charge per hive + gst? For singles or doubles?

No I can’t tell you .

We have blueberries next to our place so I put the hives on my side of the fence and they pollinate for free . 

I only get a phone call if I’m late putting then there 😉.

Wild bumblebees do a fair bit of blueberry pollination if they are about 

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