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Who's up for the sugar tax?


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Does anyone else find it pretty terrifying that suicide is the second leading cause of death for non Maori males and third for Maori males :confused:

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Society in general is terrifying- it's why I prefer plants and bees.

I was astonished.

I couldn't believe it.

I knew it was a problem but I didn't realise it was that bad :( how blimin awful

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When me and my brother were little fellas, we were introduced to the naughty word jar, every time we said a naughty word we had to put a coin in the jar, we went broke pretty quickly and were even putting in IOU's.

What we learnt was self control when speaking around mum, it didnt stop us from swearing in conversation, just self control

 

Sugar tax would be the swear jar for people with a sweet tooth and no self control

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Does anyone else find it pretty terrifying that suicide is the second leading cause of death for non Maori males and third for Maori males :confused:

 

I'm not completely certain that this table translates quite as freely as it may seem. I think we need to understand exactly how it was compiled and just what the "age standardisation" effect is.

The lung cancer position is equally very troubling! Don't we have to ask why???? Smoking? A real contributor but how much does living directly down wind of Australia's atmospheric nuclear testing program contribute??

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A real contributor but how much does living directly down wind of Australia's atmospheric nuclear testing program contribute??

I think if there was a link to be made there would be significant spikes around Pripyat (sp) and seascale. As it stands they are seeing elevated brain tummers, lucemia and birth defects (not so much in seascales case)

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And it's a basic way of encouraging people to eat better, they should also take the tax off fresh fruit and veges.

 

 

Rather than tax unhealthy food I think they should untax healthy food.

 

 

While it is nice to say removing the GST from fruit and veges it will not work-it would be cheaper to set up a food stamp type system to subsidise the people who needed help with getting the right food....

 

The powers that be "promised" to take GST off fresh foods after the bugs with introducing GST were ironed out, back at the same time that they "promised" that GST would never rise above 10%

They have since said that it would be too difficult to administer.

Australia does it.

 

I have old Coles (Aussie supermarket chain) receipts that show $20 dollar purchases with only 40-50c GST, and it shows exactly which items I paid GST on. Back in 2012 that was 2 days of eating pretty well. Without muesli bars and the odd packet of chips I'd have eaten entirely GST free.

Oh, food was somewhat cheaper there than at home ;)

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The powers that be "promised" to take GST off fresh foods after the bugs with introducing GST were ironed out, back at the same time that they "promised" that GST would never rise above 10%

They have since said that it would be too difficult to administer.

Australia does it.

 

I have old Coles (Aussie supermarket chain) receipts that show $20 dollar purchases with only 40-50c GST, and it shows exactly which items I paid GST on. Back in 2012 that was 2 days of eating pretty well. Without muesli bars and the odd packet of chips I'd have eaten entirely GST free.

Oh, food was somewhat cheaper there than at home ;)

The thing is.... It is actually a nightmare to administer....

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You keep saying this and I keep wondering what would be so hard about it.

A mcdonald's burger has fresh tomato and lettuce in it where as milk has been pasteurized and packaged making it value added etc therefor not 'fresh fruit and veg'. If you dont want to pay GST on fresh fruit and vege then grow your own.

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You keep saying this and I keep wondering what would be so hard about it.

The actual tax bit would be fine and most software already allows multiple sales tax rates. Well it did when I worked on it years ago and it has to if you want to sell it anywhere but here.

The problem comes in deciding what is food and what is junk. Somebody has to rule on every food, pretty much, which means the fine details of nutrition must be analysed.

Potatoes are food. Potato chips are junk. But are baked potatoes food?

If so, do they become junk if you add sour cream and cheese? What if you just add olive oil and salt? Olive oil is good for you but too much fat is bad for you and salt is the devil's work.

If you just say fresh fruit and vegetables, it's fairly straightforward but what about meat? There's lean meat (healthy), mince (the same but ground up), hamburger patties and sausages (made from the mince) - where is the line as far as healthy options go?

We all know what we think junk food is but there is a large grey area.

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Exactly.

No, not exactly.

Take the example of a fresh salad......just fresh fruit & veg- right- no tax? but what about the dressing on it? how would you administer deciding how much tax should be paid.

One of the good things of the NZ GsT system is the very simplicity of it....and as a result is a very cost efficient tax(for the govt) with little wrangling about what can be claimed and what cant.

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I would love to know how many calories I consumed when I was growing up. I suspect it would be two or three times what I eat now and yet until I was in my 20s I looked like my mother never fed me. Sugar went on or in just about everything along with butter and meat was always fatty (and delicious) , salt was sprinkled with gay abandon. Oil was unheard of, you needed a doctor's prescription to buy margarine (strange but true) and everything was fried in fat.

Now the only thing that's not low-salt, sugar-free and lean in my life is me.

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No, not exactly.

Take the example of a fresh salad......just fresh fruit & veg- right- no tax? but what about the dressing on it? how would you administer deciding how much tax should be paid.

One of the good things of the NZ GsT system is the very simplicity of it....and as a result is a very cost efficient tax(for the govt) with little wrangling about what can be claimed and what cant.

The aim should not be to maximise efficiency or minimise price of administration. The overarching focus should be on promoting healthy eating. If that costs the country a little more up front then I would consider that money well spent. The country will make savings later when we don't get so sick.

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A head of broccoli at pacnslave this week $3 take 15% gst off that and it's $2.55 that wouldn't encourage me to buy it. I can get a maccas cheese burger for 99cents.

Put a 20% tax on sugary drinks and the price goes from $1 a litre to $1.20 that's not going to stop people buying it.

You have to decide what the tax is for if it's just a tax to get more money then 20% will do it, if it's tax to make it more prohibitive for people buying it and therefore consuming it then it has to go up 100's of percent

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Precedence has been set in Australia. Not too hard for the likes of Countdown to follow their parent company is it?

Who would follow the Australian model? Sugary breakfast cerals are GST-free there. Then you get things like baking soda and vinegar. GST free if intended for food, but they attract GST if intended for cleaning. If you are targeting health, surely cleanliness is as beneficial as nutrition.

You would just have to say fresh and unprocessed fruit and vegetables are GST free, possibly along with eggs, meat and milk. Everything else stays the same. Your ''fresh'' supermarket salad that has been sat on the shelf for days (but because it is washed in bleach has not decayed) would attract GST. So would those bags of leaves composting on the shelf, and the carrot sticks and apple slices in plastic bags, the cooked boiled eggs and the prepared beetroot in bags.

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Your ''fresh'' supermarket salad that has been sat on the shelf for days (but because it is washed in bleach has not decayed) would attract GST.

Not if they sold you the lettuce and then offered to wash it in bleach for free

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Take the example of a fresh salad......just fresh fruit & veg- right- no tax?

Correct. Purchased from greengrocer etc for use at home. GST to apply as usual on bought meals.

 

 

 

We need to move away from the government needing to fix everything-the govemerment are about as good at running things effecently as I am good at spelling.

 

You need to look at the workplace fatality stats since the govt hardened up OSH regs.....

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