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Manuka Access & Per Hive Rates - West Coast


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That's cause you are a north island softie.

Over 40 years ago I spent three days canoeing the peloris river while attending Outward Bound. I would like to say I remember the beauty and tranquility but mostly I remember the bone chilling cold wi

I have to find another 6 sites, one Kanuka/bush site owner wants 75$ per hive and the others are after no less than $50 plus honey??? Last year I made a 35$ profit on all these sites and after paying

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Over 40 years ago I spent three days canoeing the peloris river while attending Outward Bound. I would like to say I remember the beauty and tranquility but mostly I remember the bone chilling cold with ice on the side of the river. In the end I think most of us just wanted to crawl into the bush and die. I went back a few years ago and found it to be very beautiful but you wouldn't get me  putting my big toe in, even in the middle of summer.

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1 minute ago, john berry said:

Over 40 years ago I spent three days canoeing the peloris river while attending Outward Bound. I would like to say I remember the beauty and tranquility but mostly I remember the bone chilling cold with ice on the side of the river. In the end I think most of us just wanted to crawl into the bush and die. I went back a few years ago and found it to be very beautiful but you wouldn't get me  putting my big toe in, even in the middle of summer.

That's cause you are a north island softie.:8_laughing:

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On 01/01/2018 at 8:56 PM, Trevor Gillbanks said:

This is getting crazy.  There is no way this stupidity can keep on.  However the media hype it all up so farmers/landowners are getting more and more greedy.

I think beekeeping now is just like politics....Some or many farmers/people count the chocks before it hatch. 

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I see it as there are an over supply of beekeepers and hives and  an under supply of sites. Prices will keep rising until they balance out.  The tricky thing is yield, this part is highly variable and allows for interesting numbers to be calculated in a spreadsheet.  Thing is the next year could be the big year,  do you really want to miss out?  Beekeeping is like playing lotto.  You have to be in to win. 

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Interesting dynamics going on too, while it may appear that farmed Manuka would be an attractive option, the price of lamb has increased dramatically thanks to China whom have come from 10% of exports to 70% within 2 years and push up prices. So maybe we will see a surge in interest in farming sheep.  Perhaps farmers will begin to spray out low grade Manuka/kanaka again. 

 

Edited by flash4cash
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A few miles from me there is a yard of at least 40 hives out in the middle of what is effectively a desert. As far as I can tell they belong to one of the big new players but I have to wonder what they are doing their as there is no way the country they are in could support even half that number.

Lots of reasons come to mind.

One. The hives are under AFB quarantine.

Two. They have the hives but nowhere to put them.

Three. They have forgotten they are there. Considering the hives are still two high and you can see bees hanging up the fronts this may be the true answer. I have seen it happen before.

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One if the big problems with beekeeping is its too easy to start up for yourself. Keep 50 hives for yourself while working for the man then with a bit of skill and some savings that can be 200 plus hives the following spring and fairly close to a full time self employment. While not everybody wants to take the leap, this ease of setup means more of the top level beeks go it alone equaling a dilution of skill in the big companys....

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1 hour ago, Adam O'Sullivan said:

Hopefully this does not mean that those of us who do clover will be flooded by hives!

Hmmm ...... The crystal ball that we have gazed into for the last twenty years has gone hazey.  Our man overseas who has always bought our white clover honey has been remarkably quiet for the last two years. The last time he came to visit his comment was that NZ honey was very expensive on the world market, and that he was nervous to buy " High grade NZ manuka" as it was a lot of risk to carry for a few years .....

 

Clover honey ......who knows, but as a bulk market commodiity we are looking at cranking up our "Label sales' again into Europe and making a mark up on a  commodidity item.  As hobbyist's who produce  a limited amount of product it may be the way to go.  No different from selling honey at a Farmers market, just a little bit more complexed.

 

I pass this on, more in a sense of community as a way a "Commercial Hobbyist" is looking to the future in what is obviously gonna be a market of oversupply out of NZ for the next few years.

 

Good luck.

 

 

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No ... we gave up being a Mega Corporate and downscaled to a commercial hobbyist with 1500. I have a feeling we might downscale again this year, which is why it is important that the Mega Corporates have a good year to keep up the optimism  in the industry, not to mention the price of bee hives. 

Edited by jamesc
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Bee keeping is not the only industry to face a major shakedown under a new testing regime.

With the change of status of cannabis in California traditional cannabis farms in northern California got licences and went legit as the rules gradually changed.

One northern California farm which produces about 600 lbs of cannabis annually recently  had 80% rejected under the new testing regime.

For relatively minor things the black market would ignore.

So there will  soon be a 2 tier market of expensive cannabis that passes the test and really cheap black market stuff.

The industry will soon be  completely dominated by big business who  have no historical experience or interest in cannabis but can afford the very expensive controlled climate conditions to grow it and access to law makers to write rules to suit them. 

 

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50 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

Bee keeping is not the only industry to face a major shakedown under a new testing regime.

With the change of status of cannabis in California traditional cannabis farms in northern California got licences and went legit as the rules gradually changed.

One northern California farm which produces about 600 lbs of cannabis annually recently  had 80% rejected under the new testing regime.

For relatively minor things the black market would ignore.

So there will  soon be a 2 tier market of expensive cannabis that passes the test and really cheap black market stuff.

The industry will soon be  completely dominated by big business who  have no historical experience or interest in cannabis but can afford the very expensive controlled climate conditions to grow it and access to law makers to write rules to suit them. 

 

Lol, So its true, you are an old hippy

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