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I had an interesting conversation with a Canadian today regarding hive yields . He was saying the clover got up to eight feet high in Canada , so I did some searches after work . Sure enough the yello

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We generally grade it by taste in the extraction room..... highly scientific. After that it goes for a pollen count and will come back as a percentage. Typical results coming back are 70% clover with a balance of borage, brassica, and honey dew, depending on where the bees have been.

We also get a colour test done. 0-9 is good but raraely achievable. The average is 20-40.

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Clover has always been graded by taste and more particularly colour which means that light honey's such as thistle have often been mixed in with it. Areas that don't produce particularly pure clover often get round it by packing it as Clover blend. There has not been the price pressures to adulterate clover like there has on manuka. Clover was always the pre-eminent honey in New Zealand but these days tends to be looked upon as second-class which is a big mistake as is still a beautiful honey and in the comb it can be truly stunning.

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We generally grade it by taste in the extraction room..... highly scientific. After that it goes for a pollen count and will come back as a percentage. Typical results coming back are 70% clover with a balance of borage, brassica, and honey dew, depending on where the bees have been.

We also get a colour test done. 0-9 is good but raraely achievable. The average is 20-40.

That sounds like a very nice honey blend

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We generally grade it by taste in the extraction room..... highly scientific. After that it goes for a pollen count and will come back as a percentage. Typical results coming back are 70% clover with a balance of borage, brassica, and honey dew, depending on where the bees have been.

We also get a colour test done. 0-9 is good but raraely achievable. The average is 20-40.

Do you really get honey dew coming out in a pollen count result?

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So,in general,will most clover sites have a mix in them...I was thinking those barberry / boxthorn bushes that border a lot of paddocks on farms,dandelion maybe and other flowers that are in grass mix.

Boxthorn honey is very nice ,barberry tastes like you have done an oil change and licked your fingers

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So,in general,will most clover sites have a mix in them...I was thinking those barberry / boxthorn bushes that border a lot of paddocks on farms,dandelion maybe and other flowers that are in grass mix.

the majority of honeys are a mix-the bees like a varied diet.

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Such as ??

 

Particles of the sooty mould that grows on the honeydew that covers the tree and also hyphae from the insect that exudes the honeydew.

These won't tell you how much honeydew is in your sample but they will identify the honey as having beechdew in it.

Willow dew also has a high conductivity and won't show up in your honey if just relying on pollen analysis.

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Ths

 

Particles of the sooty mould that grows on the honeydew that covers the tree and also hyphae from the insect that exudes the honeydew.

These won't tell you how much honeydew is in your sample but they will identify the honey as having beechdew in it.

Willow dew also has a high conductivity and won't show up in your honey if just relying on pollen analysis.

Thanks for responding. I retired for the evening.

Honeydew elements appear as dark chains under the microscope. You can also see yeast cells which appear as small bubbles. Elements present will only tell you there is a certain amount of dew present.

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I bought some creamed clover last month at central Otago honey shop, it's very white and fine during tasting.

I would say it's one of the best clover that I ever had, the other best clover(labelled as white gold honey) I had tried is from Canada area.

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42 minutes ago, john berry said:

The clover honey from Canada may be White sweet clover rather than white clover. I tried some Yellow sweet clover Straight out of the hive on the Salisbury Plains last year and it was one of the nicest mild honey is I have ever tried stop

I had an interesting conversation with a Canadian today regarding hive yields . He was saying the clover got up to eight feet high in Canada , so I did some searches after work . Sure enough the yellow sweet clover is pretty impressive.it sounds as though it has naturalised in quite a few areas now .  Figures of up to 500 pounds of honey per acre are quoted ! That’s over 550kg/ha if my numbers are correct . Also the sugar content in the nectar is much higher so that must help the bees to pack the supers fast . The only negative is apparently if hay made from sweet clover gets mouldy it can contain toxins that act as anticoagulants, like rat bait . 

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