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Deadly myrtle rust endangers manuka and pohutukawa


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well well what a surprise. I knew I had a Hebe in front of my honey shed, now I know what a koromiko looks like. Thanks

I might have stretched the truth a little. I know that Koromiko is a hebe. I don't know that all hebe are Koromiko. I suspect not.

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I assume hebe being a Maori word does not have an S added. Aren't all maori words like one sheep many sheep one tui many tui lots of Hebe.

Don't think Hebe is a Maori word. The Maori alphabet I was taught at school did not have the letter "B".

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Live and learn. I always thought it was a maori word.90 odd species mostly found in New Zealand. I don't think I ever picked up that there was no b in the language either.Mind you I tried to spell honey with a u the other day which gives an indication on how strong my spelling ability is.

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Live and learn. I always thought it was a maori word.90 odd species mostly found in New Zealand. I don't think I ever picked up that there was no b in the language either.Mind you I tried to spell honey with a u the other day which gives an indication on how strong my spelling ability is.

It probably better than mine.

Auto correct and spell check are marvellous innovations I rely on.

But they do have a mind of their own

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Live and learn. I always thought it was a maori word.90 odd species mostly found in New Zealand. I don't think I ever picked up that there was no b in the language either.

Maori never had a written language. It was the the early settlers that started to write down their words using the English alphabet. Looks like they didn't want someone to say they copy the English alphabet so they left the b out and said it was Maori. Ingenius eh?

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Looks like they didn't want someone to say they copy the English alphabet so they left the b out and said it was Maori. Ingenius eh?

 

Huh? What the English settlers did was simply translate spoken Maori into English via transliteration so as there are no 'b' sounds (as well as quite a few others English sounds) then consequently there is no 'b' in the 'written Maori language'

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