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Deadly myrtle rust endangers manuka and pohutukawa


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  • 2 weeks later...

"Growing conditions in nurseries are seen as ideal for the fungus with many vulnerable young plants in sheltered, warm and damp environments."

And I imagine nurserymen are more likely than most to be keeping an eye out and recognising what they're seeing.

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I was told today it's been found in two locations on great barrier. The horse may well have bolted on this one.

I expect it is in our area somewhere.

If it blows across the Tasman and is in Taranaki I can not see how it is not here .

But if it is we will not notice the extent till next summer when the temps increase into the zone the rust likes to grow in .

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Find something and report it to MPI and the tendency is for them to close you down for the duration as happened with a possible EFB report a few years back. No compensation. As it is beekeepers in the myrtle rust affected areas have been asked not to move their hives. I can just see the corporate's obeying that one.

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We are due to pick up about 800 native plants on Monday for riparian planting,just got a call from taranaki regional council and all plant pickups have been postponed for an undetermined time .

Suspension has come from mpi

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Find something and report it to MPI and the tendency is for them to close you down for the duration as happened with a possible EFB report a few years back. No compensation. As it is beekeepers in the myrtle rust affected areas have been asked not to move their hives. I can just see the corporate's obeying that one.

I did not realise that hive movement was banned from infected areas.

Will that last until the whole country has rust

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Will only be a few weeks either way.

 

What a pity! Stopping the great migrations (permanently)would solve a lot of problems in the industry and for the smaller beek! Imagine......permanent apiaries only.......might even be bye bye corporates and other encroachers!:whistle:

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Further to my post #39 above about hebe's, I would be interested to see what groups of plants will not be affected by rust, and may have an important role to play in honey production in the future. I presume that clover is in this group ...

 

I'm sure we have people on the forum with this botanical info.

 

Thanks.

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