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Can anyone see flaws in this scheme for making Beewraps?

I have a polystyrene box with a glass lid that serves good duty as a wax melter.

 

Following the method offered in the Soapers thread, I was going to put the chosen fabric in a large polystyrene meat tray (clean-unused:)) and add the wax & oil and put into the 'solar oven'. Will the wax get too hot for the polystyrene meat tray?

 

I have already found one flaw in my plan of using muslin as the fabric.....don't cut it before its been washed! I cut some sandwich wrap sized pieces, and when washed they have gone out of shape and shrunk considerably:(

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Following the method offered in the Soapers thread, I was going to put the chosen fabric in a large polystyrene meat tray (clean-unused:)) and add the wax & oil and put into the 'solar oven'. Will the wax get too hot for the polystyrene meat tray?

Yep. The polystyrene will melt. Find a metal tray or oven meat dish will be better. A solar oven will get to 80 or 90 deg C

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@Mummzie

Muslin is very fine. You'll need to experiment. Several thicknesses could work

I'm not completely happy with my end results compared to the ones I was given

Have fun

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@Beefriendly

did you use tee tree oil? It is quite a distinct smell and I can't help but think you wouldn't want that on foodstuffs.

I'm working blind here, never having seen the 'original' I have nothing to compare the result with.....so it will be fun.:)

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@Mummzie, yes I did

The tree oil smell disappears with time.

I would melt the beeswax and combine with oil another time

Then leave to harden before grating

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More than I used!

@Bron may have a better idea of ratio

I also did the iron technique

That is tin foil, kitchen paper fabric, beeswax, another layer of paper and then tin foil

Use a really hot iron

Add more beeswax and heat until the fabric saturated

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I'm crossing my fingers for a clear day tomorrow....solar melter, and possibly solar oven are going to be put to work.

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IMG_0651.JPG.69322ae2735b3b48c990f6bbe0d3f8ee.JPG @Mummzie

Photos the 2 on the bowls are the purchased ones I was given

The folded 1, my attempt

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IMG_0651.JPG.69322ae2735b3b48c990f6bbe0d3f8ee.JPG

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IMG_0664.JPG.e5ea25563c6f5bbf6f0fc74694b31f48.JPG @Mummzie @Bron @Daley

Thanks for your posts, enthusiasm and advice

I've mixed an almond oil beeswax mix and redone a large wrap

Eureka!

I would suggest a 70/30 ratio beeswax to oil

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IMG_0664.JPG.e5ea25563c6f5bbf6f0fc74694b31f48.JPG

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I had never heard of bee wraps until I read this thread and googled them.

Do people find them useful.

The idea seems great

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I am playing at making them for 2 reasons....

1-I have the wax,

2- the daughter and D.I.L both said they liked the idea.

Given cotton is a very environmentally damaging crop, and these wraps have a life of 'up to a year if cared for' they certainly will not save the planet. However, if they reduce the usage of Glad Wrap....is that a bad thing?

I used to take my school lunch wrapped in luncheon paper....and if I was lucky it hadn't got sodden from external moisture sources or the sandwich filling.....plastic wraps improved things considerably.

 

I will be interested to hear the opinions from people who are using them.

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The sun didn't make a useful appearance today and because I had the oven on to dry some paprikas I tried @Bron @Beefriendly tips for making Beewraps.

 

I had washed some stockinette cheesecloth, and also some patchwork cotton. the stockinette was cut approx 25cm square-ish

I poured on about 1 1/2 tsp of almond oil and made sure there was good coverage. Then sprinkled on about 2 tablespoons of grated wax, cloth.jpg.f7217f1dad95e0d40bda3fd40953de66.jpg and into the oven for long enough to melt. Then I gave the still warm cloth a rub around to make sure everything was well distributed.

The stockinette molds well round a bowl,5992ebbef410b_sandwichwrapped.jpg.28bd2bd64f0e09dfcc88afbe032ca379.jpg and am still not sure about that aroma with foodstuffs.

 

My hands are nice and soft tho.(y)

bowls.jpg.791f4a09dc9e7a854e8eef4a64349e5a.jpg

cloth.jpg.f7217f1dad95e0d40bda3fd40953de66.jpg

bowls.jpg.791f4a09dc9e7a854e8eef4a64349e5a.jpg

5992ebbef410b_sandwichwrapped.jpg.28bd2bd64f0e09dfcc88afbe032ca379.jpg

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I've been overnighting getting the last of our honey off in tiger country! Missed lots in 48 hours.

 

Yep it's trial and error! They're looking good.

 

I threw my first efforts back in the oven and gave them another life after I'd used them for quite a while.

 

I wrap my lunch in one most days.

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@Mummzie, mine are now over 2 years old. They are good for covering small bowls of left overs. I tend to use glass containers with fitted lids primarily. We also use lunch boxes for work.

I have wrapped cheese in them

My initial attempts at wax wraps have not been so successful, as in they lacked the cling factor.

I'll use it more now, thanks to information from the forum.

Certainly cost effective!

The biggest size wrap was $25 to buy, when I first priced them

LOL though..I went to check out the bee activity at the hives, soon after playing with the wraps and lotion bars.

Quickly retreated as the guard bees were very buzzy... they must have a good sense of smell!

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A few days ago I built a wax melter out of a broken chilly bin and first of all it was great fun and secondly it is working :)

So I processed all my wax collected during the previous year and during the extraction and I decided to go with the beeswax wrapper. I went to the spotlight (went, hehe, I drove my wife there) and while she was obeserving the occult things that are on sale I found things called flat fats but I don't know why. Whatever, I bought some with different patterns.

 

I went through several articles on the internet about these things and there were suggestions of oils and gums and resins but I ignored them all and went straight to the making. I guess the oil/resin mixed with the wax would make it a bit more flexible, maybe next time I'll try that.

 

Method 1:

Pour liquid wax on the clothes and brush it in - that is not the way as it became clear very quickly, the wax sets in seconds before it can saturate the textile it gets uneven and leaves dry spots

Method 2: 

Folded the flat fats tightly in a baking mould, put a chunk of wax on thop of it and let it melt and soak through. This is way better than the previous thing but everything gets oversaturated and I had to grab the iron and baking paper to get the excess wax out of the textiles. Wax goes everywhere and my better half used strong words when she saw the state of her iron (this part is still ongoing somewhat :)) It's hard to guess how much wax do you need, I definitely overdone it.

Method 3:

I used the cheese grater to make wax flakes (further strong opinions from my better half for some reason) and used the flakes to cover the textile and used the baking paper and the iron to make it saturate the cloths. If you make just a dozen wrappers I think this is the best way to process small scale, although I think it would be tedious for bigger operation.

 

All in all I made 14 pieces of waxed wrappers in different sizes and they work very well in the lunchboxes and in a (new) chilly bin on the beach yesterday. They're not sticky, they repel water nicely and easy to fold/wrap things in them. My granny used to have huge sheets of waxed canvas as table cover but these things have disappeared as cheap plastics came in...

 

Apparently I can't attach pics at the moment, I'll upload them later.

 

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@Gabor- todays useless bit of information is the answer to why the fabric is sold as Flat Fats. The fabric is cut to 1 yard (patchwork = American = imperial measurements), and then cut into Quarters. That's a fat Quarter. The little folded package of fabric is therefore a flat fat.

 

The last few I made were using a wax/oil/ pine resin mix- left to set and then grated on a specially purchased grater. The solar melter is plenty hot enough to melt the product on a clear sunny day, then distribute thru the cloth by rolling/rubbing. 

I'm very happy with the addition of pine resin.

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21 minutes ago, Mummzie said:

@Gabor- todays useless bit of information is the answer to why the fabric is sold as Flat Fats. The fabric is cut to 1 yard (patchwork = American = imperial measurements), and then cut into Quarters. That's a fat Quarter. The little folded package of fabric is therefore a flat fat.

 

 

it is not useless info at all, thanks for sharing it, I would never guess why it is called flat fats :)  I kinda guessed it must be ralated to the barbaric measurement system tho... 

Now I'm gong to watch some quilting video, it is amazing what people would do with their spare time :)

next time I'll try the resin thing!

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I use resin and jojoba oil with wax .

Melt all in the top of a double boiler .

Paint on fabric that is layed out on baking paper on an oven tray.

Bake in oven at 100 for 10 mins .

Take out and carefully lift wax cloth by corners and hold till stiff.

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39 minutes ago, Gabor said:

Now I'm gong to watch some quilting video, it

careful. Its addictive.......expensive........

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34 minutes ago, Mummzie said:

careful. Its addictive.......expensive........

seems like it...  just watched a lady doing undescribable things with a sewing machine, rulers and textile while she was drinking red wine :)

 

the only thing I understood was the pizza cutter :) 

I think I'm rather gonna stick with clay target shooting, not cheap either but at least I know what I'm doing there

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I used 70 / 30% bees wax and almond oil melted together and left to reset.  Missed out the grater and the oven step and used my ski waxing iron, let the wax melt on the iron base then iron into the fabric. Still not a quick job to get it all  the fabric impregnated.  Love using the wraps though and they make great presents.

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2.jpg.d1c9f3910c853f306b300e2012d4491b.jpg1.jpg.1c4a7c93239bf6ef2778dc8f0ef9cfa1.jpg3.jpg.8c7efebb39bac56d3b80b557d676da0f.jpg5.jpg.fcb236903c91e4f035d1403d13612507.jpg4.jpg.62eacc03e99dbbfb061c712a4dbce5ce.jpg

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Has anyone tried the iron method? Grate wax onto the material.  I have made up a block already which contains the oil and resin.  Then put between two sheets of baking paper.  Iron on and then dry.  Keen to find out the best method.  Thanks.

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