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Around the Apiary March 2017


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I work some hives yesterday that have been getting either willow or more likely poplar honeydew (same aphid). They weren't short of feed but I gave them half a feeder of sugar anyway to try and improve the brood which was awful. Bee numbers were good but the brood was terribly patchy with lots of what looked like sack brood in every hive and some with dead uncapped lavie . I have seen this before with the honeydew and suspect it is a nutritional deficiency. At least the weather has finally come right and they are bringing a bit of pollen in which should also help.

Found one hive the same a couple of days ago, strong plenty of food lots of brood a couple of the brood frames were quite shocking dead lav and sack brood. Wasn't quite sure what to do with it..

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Up at the ridge apiary yesterday to take off the wets and cappings. Got to the excluder and found a hundred of so dead bees so I looked for some sign of disease. While doing that I thought a hive had started to swarm but it was robber bees. I had no idea it was so intense.

 

I checked the weakest hive and it was completely empty of stores and home bees, just robbers and wasps. I reduced the entrances on the other hives and I'm up there today with the vespex.

 

Any suggestions on how to avoid or reduce robbing? I suspect having the wets on might have started it all off. Do your own bees rob off each other in the same apiary?

Bees have a two week memory

So they keep on coming back to check if they can get any thingb

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A light blast with a can of Dazzle works well too. Don't wet them though or the liquid carrier will kill them. It works well on wasps, they can be easier to track & it's quite satisfying seeing orange bodies in the nest you've just wammed.

I have some wasps in my wasp trap that I was going to flour

It never occurred to me to use dazzle.

Would I let them go in the evening

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Would I let them go in the evening

Let them go when the sun is low yes, so you have a better chance of following their flight line. If you can get in the shade yourself but watch them flying in the sun it can be quite easy seeing where they go.

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managed to annoy a bee by using a hand saw to cut up some timber only a few metres from her home. Took me a few seconds to realise that i had been stung, and that there were other bees buzzing my way with intent. I've taken a quick coffee break, will be interesting to see if they've calmed down when i continue.

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So as a result of the awful season I have been politely ignoring my backyard hive... Went through it today (caus I should prob throw some varroa treatment in it i guess) Pulled it apart and harvested 23 frames of honey from the 27 frames total.... They even made capped honey on the excluder.... So.... I guess I should have put an extra box on it earlier lol

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About robbing, a tip I heard was to put netting over all of the hives (pallets) so no bees can go in or out. The incoming and outgoing foragers do get banked up, but if you're quick it wont matter and it stiffles robbing because the communication channels are cut. You can just remove the netting off the hive you are working on.

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Finished off treating my hives yesterday,3 box hives are going to stay as they are.These received 8 strips each ,of bayvarol,between bottom two boxes.

Another emergency nuc I made at beginning of the month,has a mated queen ,eggs n larvae.It is low on stores so will be needing a feed of 2:1.IMG_20170324_165401.jpg.3709f6266d3588e5a54454afb30ac0ae.jpg

Checked on urban/rural hives and the two boxer that was queenless last check,same....mated queen eggs and larvae present.Treatments added.

So,noted in diary that splits done up to beginning of March,can be successful with the right conditions!

IMG_20170324_165401.jpg.3709f6266d3588e5a54454afb30ac0ae.jpg

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Finished off treating my hives yesterday,3 box hives are going to stay as they are.These received 8 strips each ,of bayvarol,between bottom two boxes.

Another emergency nuc I made at beginning of the month,has a mated queen ,eggs n larvae.It is low on stores so will be needing a feed of 2:1.[ATTACH=full]17304[/ATTACH]

Checked on urban/rural hives and the two boxer that was queenless last check,same....mated queen eggs and larvae present.Treatments added.

So,noted in diary that splits done up to beginning of March,can be successful with the right conditions!

 

Nice of you to put that table in for them.

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Ae..."cup of tea" ,as far as my hives are concerned, yeah I'm stoked with how they have done since starting,

however ,winter is yet to come and I know that is the true test of how good ur beeking is,coming out the other side with least amount of losses etc.

The knowledge I have gained in such a short time is due to ,pretty much,all the helpful peeps on this website and locals I know in the industry.I know there is lots more to learn...so here's to ongoing learning!

I looked on the map where you are and thought ,wow, what a choice spot.

You probably have lovely winters and your bees will not completely shut down.

We may have not great summer's but mild winters so my bees remain a bit active.

I put them in the hakea where if they want to fly there is a food source for them.

Otherwise I would have to keep feeding them or leave lots of honey .

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