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Trevor Gillbanks

Around the Apiary March 2017

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I was around at my brother in laws place today and saw his pears were falling and rotting. I was expecting to see wasps, but saw this instead. Not a wasp in sight

 

 

Same at my place there should be stacks of wasps over the pears but not one in site

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I do wonder about honey being labeled or sold as organic, it's possible if the hives are on organic certified land and 3 to 4 km from any uncertified land, tell me if I have got this wrong?

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Oh goodness, I tried to find some facts on this. However gave up when I found an 'expert' on raw unfiltered honey who said it hardly ever crystalised.

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I do not think someone will risk to add sugar to his/her honey or feed such an amount of sugar syrup in the season to increase "the crop".

This is a very small country and it takes a very short time to fail.

 

I know personally people who are asking me for runny honey. They come from a particularly European country where customers buy almost only runny honey. Over there crystallized honey is considered(by average consumers) as sugar was mixed into the honey - because a nice, pure runny honey will have no chance to form those crystals by itself.

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Blasted TURKEYS !! Our neighbourhood is down to the last two hens thanks to a concerted three year effort. Either dry horrible eating

or they taste of crickets or hawthorn berries.

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Blasted TURKEYS !! Our neighbourhood is down to the last two hens thanks to a concerted three year effort. Either dry horrible eating

or they taste of crickets or hawthorn berries.

Yeah, they are lucky it was a sunday morning and I didnt want to wake the neighbours...

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I do not think someone will risk to add sugar to his/her honey or feed such an amount of sugar syrup in the season to increase "the crop".

This is a very small country and it takes a very short time to fail.

 

I know personally people who are asking me for runny honey. They come from a particularly European country where customers buy almost only runny honey. Over there crystallized honey is considered(by average consumers) as sugar was mixed into the honey - because a nice, pure runny honey will have no chance to form those crystals by itself.

 

Weve had folk ask just give us that cheap crystalised stuff.

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Time for us all to educate the masses on the quality of our beautiful NZ honey varieties :)

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Blasted TURKEYS !! Our neighbourhood is down to the last two hens thanks to a concerted three year effort. Either dry horrible eating

or they taste of crickets or hawthorn berries.

You should give turkeys more credit .

 

Why Did These Turkeys Circle Around a Dead Cat?

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Shut down my 2 cell raising hives today and used the last lots of cells that had queens emerging as I was lifting the grafting bar out. I didn't have need for the all... the ones I could use I introduced as virgin queens straight in to the colonies, these cell raising nucs were 3 box high 5 framers so I split boxes off on to floors and new roof = instant strong 5 frame nucs that accepted the virgins without a worry. Next step is to inspect in a few of weeks for mated laying queens.

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Was hoping for nice weather as 20 queen cells put out last week. Most had exited by Sunday, rainy yesterday and last night, but sunny today and for the next three days.

So I am hoping that the queens are doing their fitness and orientation by now, and have three days for action ! That will be 11 nucs, 6 re-queens, 2 mating mini nucs as trials, 1 given away.

That's 15 from Otto, and 5 from my Jenter system, 4 looked pretty good and I used the small one just to see how she goes ... And Otto's look pretty good, as expected.

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Today I requeened a non performing hive with an out of town italian queen.

I wanted some new good genetics

This hive was ok until about a month ago when I noticed there was a lot of drone brood, this was a year old queen.

The hive has since superseded her and the new queen seems to be laying well.

So I put a division board in the hive and put the out of town queen on top.

I will see how the superseded queen goes. I now have too many queens .should I squish all the spring ones in favour of my late summer supersedure queens ?

I also dumped three frames of bees on the ground who seemed to be 80% drones.

I hoped the hive would keep them out .

I am not sure how long our season will go on.

The weather will last but not the forage WP_20170307_14_01_26_Pro.jpg.4c4284f6cfd68c22dbd307bcef0f03c0.jpg

WP_20170307_14_01_26_Pro.jpg.4c4284f6cfd68c22dbd307bcef0f03c0.jpg

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I now have too many queens .should I squish all the spring ones in favour of my late summer supersedure queens ?

Why not put a queen excluder in and then run the hive as a double queen. I quite often do this late in the Autumn and that way i have a spare queen if someone turns their toes up. I then split the hive in the spring when they start to build up.

 

I had a morning today speaking to one of the local Probus clubs. Over 80 members in attendance. It was great to catch up on quite a few of them who retired a few years before me. Today was a great follow up on the Fair Go program and the 250 gm pot of honey @ $259.00.

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Why not put a queen excluder in and then run the hive as a double queen. I quite often do this late in the Autumn and that way i have a spare queen if someone turns their toes up. I then split the hive in the spring when they start to build up.

 

I had a morning today speaking to one of the local Probus clubs. Over 80 members in attendance. It was great to catch up on quite a few of them who retired a few years before me. Today was a great follow up on the Fair Go program and the 250 gm pot of honey @ $259.00.

I am always concerned that one queen will kill the other.

But I think I will try and run a double queen hive with a couple of my other queens and see how it works.

But not my out of town queen.

 

Do you think a $260 pot of honey would keep me looking young.

Do your retired friends use it to keep young

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Do you think a $260 pot of honey would keep me looking young.

Do your retired friends use it to keep young

It keeps me young trying to spent the $1000.00 per kg honey.

 

I am always concerned that one queen will kill the other.

But I think I will try and run a double queen hive with a couple of my other queens and see how it works.

Just make sure the queens are separated by the queen excluders, they will be fine.

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Checked two hives post MAQS this evening. Seven and six mites respectively. I'll test all hives this weekend and retreat where necessary. Will be interesting to see if there is a pattern to those that have failed.

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My cell raisers have cells at day 1 & 4 so should dodge this weather but will be my last for the season.

These Mated Queens and their mating nucs will be dropped into Autumn splits.

I hope the weather plays ball and the Drones stand their ground

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Whilst checking on a couple or three hives on Mon,I found 1 of my 2 box FD hives with 14 frames of brood of various ages ? Is that normal for this time of year? I thought they spouse to be slowing up...

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if there is a flow on they will ramp up.

had willow dew pouring in.

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On a trip to Masterton today for the Southern North Island Bee education day @Jonathan and I saw a couple of beehives in a paddock. Plus a Forklift. I reckon somewhere around 300 to 400 hives. But who wants to count.

 

20170312_153002.jpg.e609d8af16f7041b5d1622662cb13307.jpg

20170312_153002.jpg.e609d8af16f7041b5d1622662cb13307.jpg

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They

On a trip to Masterton today for the Southern North Island Bee education day @Jonathan and I saw a couple of beehives in a paddock. Plus a Forklift. I reckon somewhere around 300 to 400 hives. But who wants to count.

 

[ATTACH=full]17156[/ATTACH]

They look familiar

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On a trip to Masterton today for the Southern North Island Bee education day @Jonathan and I saw a couple of beehives in a paddock. Plus a Forklift. I reckon somewhere around 300 to 400 hives. But who wants to count.

 

[ATTACH=full]17156[/ATTACH]

what would they all eat ?

or have they just been moved there for the winter

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Willow dew coming in here still but in general hives are slowing down.

Did some splits this afternoon nuc yard filling up..[ATTACH=full]17123[/ATTACH]

The cows have slowed down, thats for sure.

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