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tudor

MAQS with Open Mesh Floors

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Hi,

I may need to treat hives with sugar shake counts of around 3, and honey coming in nicely. Would use MAQS now, and maybe Bav later on.

All my hives have Open Mesh Floors.

Would it work to insert a piece of corflute cut to size (and a bit of string attached to pull it out) on top of the floor to reduce massive air flow, and leave the bottom hive entrance fully open to allow enough air flow ?

Thanks.

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Yes. Absolutely. However, beware that the bees will eat the string. Use a bit of soft wire.

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Thanks, I like a nice guffaw every day and I had my quota. Didn't think of that ...

:)

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So OMFs allow too much air flow to be effective? Im considering doing the same thing....except the weather down here is not playing ball re honey flow

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So OMFs allow too much air flow to be effective? Im considering doing the same thing....except the weather down here is not playing ball re honey flow

Correct. That is the instructions on MAQS

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Correct. That is the instructions on MAQS

Thanks for that. Have ordered some but hasn't arrived yet. Cheers

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It say close up mesh floor but leave the hive door wide open

What the difference

bees don't really know how to actively ventilate through a mesh.

 

 

bees don't really know how to actively ventilate through a mesh.

sorry. that was not a good answer. just had to toss that one in:whistle::whistle::whistle::whistle:

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The North American keeps had problems when they started to use MAQS. There were reports of bees coming out of the hive onto the front. There was also problems with Q failure. These happenings occurred when MAQS was first applied and were more likely when the weather was hot.

 

I believed the problems were caused by the higher concentrations of formic acid fumes when the strips were opened. When I used MAQS I had OMFs. I put the strips above the brood box and surrounded them with an empty super. The other supers of bees and honey went on top.

 

I hope this helps.

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I just took out my MAQS today after 7 days, I did a sugar shake on three hives 1.5 months ago and got a zero count on all three, last week in one hive I noticed a lot of DFW and very dark baby bees with no hair, and I could see varroa on some bees, so done another sugar shake and stopped counting varroa after I got to 20 per 300 bees, couldn't believe how quick an infestation can build up on you.

This is the second year I've used MAQS for a quick knock down, and after a lot of asking questions and working out what's best for my hive and setup I use, I put two strips on top of brood nest between two brood boxes as per instructions, the enterance is a permanent fixture of the floor and can't be altered, I don't lift the hive to create a gap between the bottom box and floor but I do have a open mesh floor, I did put some tape around the gaps in the honey boxes and hive mat and had a FD honey box on top to create room for the bees, at the time of theatment the hive was 2 FD brood, 1 full 3/4 honey, 1 FD honey that was emptyish, I also took into account the weather for the following week, it was cooler that usual and wet for a few days, if the weather was going to be hot I would have changed the way I setup the hive to suit the weather, didn't have any noticeable amounts of dead bees around the hive and was happy with the outcome.

Here is a pic of my sticky board after MAQS.

IMG_1088.JPG.f7390a5ae99ad6392ecb416e24b575b1.JPG

IMG_1088.JPG.f7390a5ae99ad6392ecb416e24b575b1.JPG

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That is a lot of mites. Well done

i have been using OA on my hives

i have done it 3 times once a week so far.

i am only getting 2 or 3 varroa in the inspection trays.

should i do a sugar shake to confirm this result. could it be possible i do not have many varroa in my hives

there is no sign of DWV on my bees

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i have been using OA on my hives

i have done it 3 times once a week so far.

i am only getting 2 or 3 varroa in the inspection trays.

should i do a sugar shake to confirm this result. could it be possible i do not have many varroa in my hives

there is no sign of DWV on my bees

I'm treating two hive with oxalic acid, done second treatment today, I've put a sticky board under hive which had 4 varroa per 300 bees, I'm interested in what mite fall I get over the next few weeks.

Your hive may have very low numbers of varroa, it's easy enough to do a sugar shake to see what the numbers are.

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Just a thought on mesh floors and Formic.

I dont use mesh floors but do use Formic.

My feeling is that in order to give the Formic time and concentration to get into the Brood, the hive ventilation should be restricted to a minimum satisfactory level.

If screen bottom boards are used I would be concerned that the Formic may only kill the Phoretic mites.

This is just my opinion.

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Just a thought on mesh floors and Formic.

I dont use mesh floors but do use Formic.

My feeling is that in order to give the Formic time and concentration to get into the Brood, the hive ventilation should be restricted to a minimum satisfactory level.

If screen bottom boards are used I would be concerned that the Formic may only kill the Phoretic mites.

This is just my opinion.

Before I first used MAQS I ask a heap of questions and got answers that somewhat left me confused, some people like to close up the hive and others expressed concerns over queen loss and bee causualities, I went in the middle which I think was more on the cautious side, I think next time I can close off more of the hive if the weather is simular to what I had on the last treatment.

Just reading the Wellington beekeepers news letter, Frank Lindsay mentions for a quick knock back of varroa if the levels are getting high before the autum treatment goes in, he puts 40 mls of Formica acid onto a paper towel and puts it on the open mesh floor slide (inspection board) and it knocks the varroa in the bottom super to reduce numbers.

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