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What do I do with surplus honey


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If you only have one hive and you have surplus honey, then you're a bit stuck as you can't sell it unless you meet the food regulations etc. To be honest, save it for the bees instead of feeding sugar.

 

I really wish you guys would stop recommending feeding honey back to bees. While you can get away with it with just one hive, it's really poor practice.

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Whilst on that subject, you can't give it away either. However, I and the OP were clear it was one hive, which is why I suggested it. Details are also provided in page 100 and 101 of Practival Beekeping in New Zealand.

And for clarification, I'm talking wets, (honey in a frame) not extracted honey. A a hobbyist, I only extract why I need - why put in all that extra effort for no good reason?

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I really wish you guys would stop recommending feeding honey back to bees. While you can get away with it with just one hive, it's really poor practice.

do you put your wets back on the hive

i am assuming you keep good records of which hive they came from

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I really wish you guys would stop recommending feeding honey back to bees. While you can get away with it with just one hive, it's really poor practice.

Do you actually not feed honey though?

 

Like yep I agree with you, feeding honey is definitely risky, but I do it all the time.

I just inspect the hives before moving any frames, sure it could bite me in the bum but I've been doing it for years and it hasn't happened yet.

Feeding honey back to the hive it came from though? Not much risk there.

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  • 3 weeks later...
if you want to feed bees on honey then leave honey on the hive.

 

in the said case there is only one hive. what is the diffeence in leaving the frames in the hive and giving them back to the hive? Same frames, same honey?

(I am totally agree with you on best practice, tho)

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in the said case there is only one hive. what is the diffeence in leaving the frames in the hive and giving them back to the hive? Same frames, same honey?

(I am totally agree with you on best practice, tho)

most people do not stop at just one hive. but they continue the practices they have been doing.

they tend not to change there ways even when going from 1 hive to 200 hives.

its just one of those practices that gets people into trouble and it all starts because people think its fine because you only have one hive.

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And for clarification, I'm talking wets, (honey in a frame) not extracted honey.

 

I thought "wets" were honey combs that had been extracted. Basically empty honeycomb wet with a surface layer of honey. It does provide some food, and good to get them cleaned up by the same bees, but not really enough to be considered substantial feeding.

 

On the other hand "feed honey" is a fully capped comb of honey, possibly from an undesirable source, such as when it is partly willow dew. or in this case is honey which isn't needed and could be used for generous winter/spring stores and ultimately might be useful resources for spring splits. Leaving honey stores with the hive and using it to resource splits next season is hardly worthy of a tirade.

 

If you have too much honey, then you could knock back the hive (maybe next season) with more splits and sell a few. Good fun raising queens and growing bees instead of growing honey. If you don't want to sell them except to cover costs for more gear, then you could give them to fellow club members who you believe will look after them..

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Hobbyist habits that don't work or are risky on a large scale, or or just don't fit your outfit's methodology ? Examples ?

both.

but what i'm getting at here is that once people learn something its hard to untrain them of that. they have a habit of going back to what they used to do, especially when tired.

 

of interest, air crash investigation show on tv had an episode with Russian pilots who crashed a western style plane. reason for the crash was the artificial horizon on western planes work opposite to Russian planes. tired pilot, fell back on his old original Russian training and turned the opposite way and went out of control.

its not a beekeeping thing, its a well documented fact of life.

 

if you learn to do something poorly early on, like going against the basics of afb control, then it tends to stay with them for a long time.

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both.

but what i'm getting at here is that once people learn something its hard to untrain them of that. they have a habit of going back to what they used to do, especially when tired.

 

of interest, air crash investigation show on tv had an episode with Russian pilots who crashed a western style plane. reason for the crash was the artificial horizon on western planes work opposite to Russian planes. tired pilot, fell back on his old original Russian training and turned the opposite way and went out of control.

its not a beekeeping thing, its a well documented fact of life.

 

if you learn to do something poorly early on, like going against the basics of afb control, then it tends to stay with them for a long time.

 

I do try desperately not to agree with elders etc but i am afraid i have to agree. Good habits and all that. Well said dood.

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Give it to friends, bake with it, keep it in the cupboard for when you have a bad year, make mead. There's a few ideas.

Sharing honey indeed is good feeling, also when I am in situation I buy little plastic " bear" bottles for the kids fill them with honey and share - I don't sell these. I think this is in " bees tune" in social sharing.

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