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Oxalic and glycerine

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7 minutes ago, Markypoo said:

@Philbee I have an American friend who is wanting me to post on FB about the staples. Do you have any issues with details of how to make the staples being posted where a US audience can read it? Thought it would be polite to ask even though its not like you are keeping it secret.

 

No problem

There will be a US patent application back dated to my filing date for the EP Staple.
Iponz have examined the application and agreed to some of our claims in this regard so Im as protected as I can be and there is little I can do to stop beeks in the US from getting involved currently however at some stage someone on the ground over there will turn up with a big stick if the patent is approved there and someone is manufacturing.
Wont be me because Im afraid of flying but it will be someone with good lawyers 

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On 29/12/2018 at 7:35 AM, tony said:

The punched hole in the top is not very effective on my overboard strips it seems to be the first place the bees chew then the strip drops, not with all hives but was enough for me to forget about that idea might be different for the gib tape, phil might be able to sew some button holes for you to try haha

 

The couple of strips I used like this worked well, the bees chewed them out from

the bottom up and left a small bit at the top - not sure I would bother in the future though as it’s a bit more time per hive but good to know it’s an option 

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Nice putting a name to a face @Jamo to bad I couldn’t pass on the roll of bale wrap as it had already gone to the shop at the local tip.  Excellent results with the Oa/Gl staples once again every time I hear these results it’s another tick on the board.

 

I have been in touch with Analytica Laboratories and they replied that it wouldn’t be to difficult to work out a test for oxalic acid levels in honey if there is enough demand.  I will write to the labs customer service and maybe give them a link to this forum page so they can prepare for those needing their honey tested for oxalic residues on harvest declarations.

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54 minutes ago, Jamo said:

Screenshot_20190115-084009.png

 

 

Hi @Jamo

 

how many  are eaten out like this?  My question is how many staples this eaten in each hive (rough guess) and how many hives have this much eaten after 5 weeks?

And is this the latest staples with the most stitching?

Looking at the picture it looks as though there is still a lot of staple on the sides for the bees to rub over, would this be one of your most eaten staples?

 

Edited by fieldbee

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My hives, for better or worse, all have mesh bases and there is lots of staple debris under the hive. 

 

Ive yet to see any side effect (grass die off) but wonder. There must be a lot of debris in front on solid floors (ie same volume concentrated over a smaller area) and are these seeing any changes in the ground. 

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3 hours ago, fieldbee said:

 

 

Hi @Jamo

 

how many  are eaten out like this?  My question is how many staples this eaten in each hive (rough guess) and how many hives have this much eaten after 5 weeks?

And is this the latest staples with the most stitching?

Looking at the picture it looks as though there is still a lot of staple on the sides for the bees to rub over, would this be one of your most eaten staples?

 

Maybe half of the hives I looked at which was only about 15 had at least one staple that was between a quarter to a third removed. While the other staples were largely intact. No staples were totally removed after 5 wks and those that were partly removed still had the rest of the leg hanging where it was meant to be as you can kind of see in the picture.

Like I said I was very happy with the mite wash count of 0 in the hives I tested and would expect the staples to keep killing mites for a few weeks yet.

Also the hives tested were within flying distance of maby 200 other hives Belonging to at least 3 different beekeepers so plenty of opportunity of reinvation.

I have some staples with 3 rows of internal stitching and some with 2. 3 rows is probably better but there doesn't seem to be much difference.

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4 hours ago, Oma said:

Nice putting a name to a face @Jamo to bad I couldn’t pass on the roll of bale wrap as it had already gone to the shop at the local tip.  Excellent results with the Oa/Gl staples once again every time I hear these results it’s another tick on the board.

 

I have been in touch with Analytica Laboratories and they replied that it wouldn’t be to difficult to work out a test for oxalic acid levels in honey if there is enough demand.  I will write to the labs customer service and maybe give them a link to this forum page so they can prepare for those needing their honey tested for oxalic residues on harvest declarations.

Nice to meet you and your snazzy wee truck also. Would like to see some of your bee plantations one day.

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Photos like these are going to result in some sort of zigzag or other perpendicular pattern from poor @Philbee’s machines if you aren’t careful.

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Interesting to here you say that Phil, that the S.Island hives were stronger in the spring. 

When I was a corprorate I tried to tell my business partner and accountants that it was probably cheaper to winter hives in the S. Island. They did'nt really understand and went on to negotiate winter sites  with payments and pour the syrup and pollen patties into the hives..

It cost us about 8k to bring a unit load of bees home from the Motherload. On a load of 400 that was 20 bucks. It was a litttle cheaper going back up as it was a back load ..... so 35 bucks freight. So after paying a landowner wintering fee, syrup, pollen patties ..... 35 bucks was'nt too bad a deal.

Gorse pollen is free and flowers late winter.I was impressed  at the amount of the syrup the N. Island guys were pumping during the winter, and the frequency that they were doing it...... when they should have been hibernating, or fishing .....

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Heavy duty thread is the key.  One that is bee proof. As long as the staple can hold together it is ok. 

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35 minutes ago, flash4cash said:

Heavy duty thread is the key.  One that is bee proof. As long as the staple can hold together it is ok. 

We dont seem to have too many issues with Bees chewing the thread and Ive used really heavy thread in a trial which didnt go as well as i thought it would.

There are also a lot of double row plain edge staples out there with double threading

That is two strands of 40 weight thread running through each needle.
In the end normal thread and threading worked ok.

 

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Our bees remove the paper and then somehow manage to pull the thread out the front door as well. 

The amount of time spent on this job must be staggering 

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8 hours ago, Stoney said:

Our bees remove the paper and then somehow manage to pull the thread out the front door as well. 

The amount of time spent on this job must be staggering 

Bored bees ?

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9 hours ago, Stoney said:

Our bees remove the paper and then somehow manage to pull the thread out the front door as well. 

The amount of time spent on this job must be staggering 

 

Ours are the same staple first then thread.

Sometimes when we pop a lid a bee grabs the thread and try’s to fly off with it from the top bars. Poor thing is flying hard out with a long black thread firmly fixed to the burr comb it’s never going to get it off .

what a waste of effort kinda like cleaning the loo with a house full of male teenagers :( 

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10 hours ago, flash4cash said:

Heavy duty thread is the key.  One that is bee proof. As long as the staple can hold together it is ok. 

Your average machine hates heavy duty thread . 

Only specialist machines are comfortable with it  and it is very expensive .

Edited by kaihoka

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One of if my hives a double managed to smash through 3 out 4 EP silms in 3 weeks in the bottom box free range queen. 

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12 hours ago, Stoney said:

Our bees remove the paper and then somehow manage to pull the thread out the front door as well. 

The amount of time spent on this job must be staggering 

Narrows? if so whats the life span

Sorry Stoney Im getting mixed up with posters and not reading things properly.
Im going to stop the machine at 9pm at the latest now

Edited by Philbee
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Critical update

A very serious issue has arisen in the south Island

A Canterbury supporter has been supplied Staples in Southland colors

Due to the serious nature of this incident all staples will now be supplied All Black stitch

 

rugby colors.jpg

Edited by Philbee
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Glentunnel little  Rippers are green .

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Is there a guide to finding varroa in drone cells? I have been through hundreds of them in my hives with/had staples in them. Can't find a single one. Hoping that I am doing it right but thought I had better check.

I am not upset by the thought that I haven't seen any varroa, but would like to find one just to know I am checking correctly.

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10 minutes ago, Markypoo said:

Is there a guide to finding varroa in drone cells? I have been through hundreds of them in my hives with/had staples in them. Can't find a single one. Hoping that I am doing it right but thought I had better check.

I am not upset by the thought that I haven't seen any varroa, but would like to find one just to know I am checking correctly.

 

Just uncap the cell and slide the drone pupae out. Look at the drone. Done. 

 

If if you don’t see any varroa running around on the carcass try a few more (you’ve done heaps...). 

 

Last  season I could easily find one to half a dozen. This season none. ??

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5 hours ago, Markypoo said:

Is there a guide to finding varroa in drone cells? I have been through hundreds of them in my hives with/had staples in them. Can't find a single one. Hoping that I am doing it right but thought I had better check.

I am not upset by the thought that I haven't seen any varroa, but would like to find one just to know I am checking correctly.

Markypoo use a capping scratcher, slide it side ways in under the capping and you can pull out about 50 in one go and check them

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