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ikwezinz

Oxalic and glycerine

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2 hours ago, dansar said:

Hi all 

I moved the discussion about feeding Raw (dry) sugar over here. 

 

OK .....

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Seriously though, these 93 pages are the best and most worth while I have read, thanks to Phill and others who have had a hand in these posts as this puts $$$$$ back into beeks hands.Phill you will be a busy boy in the next few months as people get their head around what you have come up with and I thank you.

Have a very what-ever you believe in holiday everyone

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Righto. 

 

I have spent much of this month re-queening and creating small starter nucs.  I've seen plenty of brood then, but no sign of mites when cracking boxes and looking at broken up drone brood.  I've scraped away at drone brood separately in hives and have not seen mites.  I've not been alcohol washing or sugar shaking, still all other observation is telling me the hives are a mite free zone.

 

I think I'll start harvesting honey from mid January this year, I think the flow or what there is of it will last longer this year due to the incessant rain.  It has seemed like this month that the weather comes right and the bees are hooning around and the wet comes in again and washes out the nectar.  It's been very stop start, and only yesterday I found three hives in a site of eight with swarm cells starting.....but back to OA - at harvest will be doing disease checks etc and getting more staples in.  I'm looking forward to having mite free hives all through Autumn, strong hives going into Winter, and strong mite free hives all with new Queens heading into next Spring.

 

 

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14 minutes ago, Dennis Crowley said:

Have a very what-ever you believe in holiday everyone

Thanks Dennis 

 

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I’ve been telling anyone who will listen about Phil’s staples I’m pretty excited by them so far. 

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Ok, so strip strategy for a newly captured swarm?

 

yes, i realise I could vaporise. But it’s pissing down right now and I’m thinking of what else I could do. 

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Oxalic/gly towel ripped in half fold each half double, stuff them down between frames

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1 hour ago, yesbut said:

Oxalic/gly towel ripped in half fold each half double, stuff them down between frames

The Paper Tape Staple is a stitched laminate for a number of reasons

One reason is that the structure holds the ingredient solution within the sturdy laminates and feeds it out through the stitch lines over an extended period.

The nature of the paper structure is such that it keeps a firm hold on the solution so as to prevent the solution from dripping out due to gravity.
The stitching also acts as a barrier to the premature removal of the staple by the chewing of the Bees.
All these aspects of the Staples design contribute to its effectiveness which has been well noted

 

 

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9 hours ago, Josh said:

Ok, so strip strategy for a newly captured swarm?

 

yes, i realise I could vaporise. But it’s pissing down right now and I’m thinking of what else I could do. 

 

Wait till it stops raining 

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On 2/12/2018 at 1:42 PM, frazzledfozzle said:

From that Philbee I read that you believe it’s the contact with the staple rather than the chewing of it that spreads the ingredient around.

we will be ordering the narrow staples in the new year 

 

If it’s the contact with the staple then what if one cut them in half, punched a hole in the top and hung them like a normal strip, would the bees then work underneath them whereas I find they tend to not work under them wrapped over a frame ?

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16 minutes ago, ikwezinz said:

 

If it’s the contact with the staple then what if one cut them in half, punched a hole in the top and hung them like a normal strip, would the bees then work underneath them whereas I find they tend to not work under them wrapped over a frame ?

Sorry ikwezinz I forgot to answer that one in your email
There is no reason why your idea shouldn't work.
A Staple is a Staple shape  for convenience sake only.
As for the bees working under them or not, its a mixed bag with the wides

Some hives will and some wont.

Its best to slide the Staples down from the top while the frames are tight in the box rather than separate the frames and then slide the frames together with staples in place.

Alternatively use EP Narrows

more narrows.jpg

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The punched hole in the top is not very effective on my overboard strips it seems to be the first place the bees chew then the strip drops, not with all hives but was enough for me to forget about that idea might be different for the gib tape, phil might be able to sew some button holes for you to try haha

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On 15/12/2018 at 11:51 AM, Philbee said:

https://www.plantandfood.co.nz/growingfutures/case-studies/bees-to-combat-varroa

 

Quote from linked Article

"Varroa, a parasitic mite which infects honey bees and can transfer fatal viral pathogens, is a source of concern to the horticultural and agricultural industries which rely on bees for crop pollination. It is estimated that the introduction of the varroa mite, discovered in New Zealand in 2000, will cost the economy between $400 and $900 million over 35 years."

 

Judging by the flow of reports back from Staple users these Cost estimates can now be adjusted substantially downward.
Possibly by as much as 50%

 

 

Haha these are such old figures in this slightly updated report, it would be interesting to know if it even cost the horticultural industry anything, sure at the time pollination costs went up, so beekeepers could reclaim some costs, but back then pollination was nearly done for love, The fact is with the increase in hive numbers we have experienced in the last 10 years or so, will have well and truly adjusted those figures the horticultural industry has most likely benefited from the manuka boom  by millions of dollars, pollination of crops has probably never been better.

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3 hours ago, tony said:

Haha these are such old figures in this slightly updated report, it would be interesting to know if it even cost the horticultural industry anything, sure at the time pollination costs went up, so beekeepers could reclaim some costs, but back then pollination was nearly done for love, The fact is with the increase in hive numbers we have experienced in the last 10 years or so, will have well and truly adjusted those figures the horticultural industry has most likely benefited from the manuka boom  by millions of dollars, pollination of crops has probably never been better.

Hi Tony, where does your post fit into the cost of Varroa to the industry?

Even at my lowly level the reduction in Varroa related costs is phenomenal.

For large outfits Varroa related cost are huge.

Most of those costs have now evaporated, was projected 400-900 million over 35 years
Today I spoke with a July customer who was re ordering for summer.
His story was typical
He initially thought the Staple was a gimmick but tried them in half his 400 colonies in August.
2 months after removing the staples, no mites in the OA hives, some mites in the synthetic treated hives.
Hence another order for under $1000 worth for this whole operation.

All the costs associated with Varroa for the foreseeable future have been slashed and those savings will go into the NZ economy

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Philbee said:

those savings will go into the NZ economy

What's to stop them joining the arab  economy via Emirate tickets ? A more sustainably equitable result would be to reduce the number of his hives and maintain current profit wouldn't it ? The real reason your dystopian (dag of a word eh) world may yet come about is economic disfunction thanks to greed.

Edited by yesbut
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5 hours ago, yesbut said:

What's to stop them joining the arab  economy via Emirate tickets ? A more sustainably equitable result would be to reduce the number of his hives and maintain current profit wouldn't it ? The real reason your dystopian (dag of a word eh) world may yet come about is economic disfunction thanks to greed.

Greed built your modern Motor bike Pink Cat

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38 minutes ago, Philbee said:

Greed built your modern Motor bike Pink Cat

Agreed, but its a very modest one, nothing like a $35k monster, and it's going to last me a long time.

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On 29/12/2018 at 7:35 AM, tony said:

The punched hole in the top is not very effective on my overboard strips it seems to be the first place the bees chew then the strip drops, not with all hives but was enough for me to forget about that idea might be different for the gib tape, phil might be able to sew some button holes for you to try haha

 

Will give the strips a try when I get them, easy for me as a hobbyist but for a commercial the fold over makes all the sense in the world for speed and ease of application

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26 minutes ago, ikwezinz said:

 

Will give the strips a try when I get them, easy for me as a hobbyist but for a commercial the fold over makes all the sense in the world for speed and ease of application

I cant remember the exact timeline @ikwezinz but its likely that you set this ball rolling.

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40 minutes ago, Philbee said:

I cant remember the exact timeline @ikwezinz but its likely that you set this ball rolling.

It’s come a long way since Jan 17 when the link to Randy’s research was first put up, that’s the bit about this forum that amazes me is how everyone is happy to share - result being you now producing a product that any beekeeper can use easily, cheaply in comparison and is very effective all through trial and error by people on this forum 

 

what astounds me is the number of beekeepers I know that refuse to consider anything new like this was two years ago, you would think it would be commonplace by now but even yesterday I was talking to a beekeeper of 15 years and he had only heard of vaporising - seems we are still a very singular breed for the most part and not open to new ideas in the main.

 

Look forward to meeting you in person

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10 hours ago, ikwezinz said:

It’s come a long way since Jan 17 when the link to Randy’s research was first put up, that’s the bit about this forum that amazes me is how everyone is happy to share - result being you now producing a product that any beekeeper can use easily, cheaply in comparison and is very effective all through trial and error by people on this forum 

 

what astounds me is the number of beekeepers I know that refuse to consider anything new like this was two years ago, you would think it would be commonplace by now but even yesterday I was talking to a beekeeper of 15 years and he had only heard of vaporising - seems we are still a very singular breed for the most part and not open to new ideas in the main.

 

Look forward to meeting you in person

Cheers 
There are a huge number out there now but I guess there are a lot of Beekeepers as well and not all are as brave as the pioneers of this system.

 

Its heartening that there are some really progressive Beeks out there who have run with this system from the start.
It was easy for me to extol the Virtues of the system having used it for 2 seasons but Very Very Brave for the early users,some of whom treated thousands of Hives straight off the bat.

 

There are very few of these initial users who have not made follow up purchases for subsequent treatments.
The average order is about 2000 staples but the range is 100 -28,000 with one Outfit using 60,000 over the season.
One Beek told me a few days ago that he initially thought they were a Cheap gimmick, that was until he did a 400 Hive trail, 50/50 with a mainstream treatment

The results were conclusive and he now uses the OA system.

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