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EPA approval is required to sell the strips as a varroaside like other treatments. The name on the approval is not who we did the tests for but same stuff. As it's listed as a treatment it will be legal to use and sell it will be interesting to see the conditions of use doc as it's classed as a organic treatment in it's home country with little restrictions. 

Sorry for the late reply I was playing with some new toys

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Hi All, I don't have time to follow every chat group, but I got a notification about this one.  I'm interested in your experiences with OA/gly in NZ, so please feel free to contact me directly at

You are obviously still young . I try and leave the bathroom before the steam has cleared .

This is an issue that comes up often There tends to be two ways that Beeks place Staples and one way results in less Brood damage. Some Beeks remove an edge frame, spread the remaining frames o

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1 hour ago, Stoney said:

I have used the 35% “philbee budget special single stitch mite destroyer” on a site which was slammed with varroa over winter.. like real bad.. ######ed.. I have been running experiments on these bees since August.. bring back to life experiments.. i must say these bees won’t make the grade to end up on a truck into the back of beyond next month but they are mite free and building. 

 

This is going to be a great thread to read come Autumn
There may even be some Greenies calling for us to give the Mites a break

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15 minutes ago, glynn said:

EPA approval is required to sell the strips as a varroaside like other treatments. The name on the approval is not who we did the tests for but same stuff. As it's listed as a treatment it will be legal to use and sell it will be interesting to see the conditions of use doc as it's classed as a organic treatment in it's home country with little restrictions. 

Sorry for the late reply I was playing with some new toys

ahh, makes sense. Guess i misunderstood this from the application form linked: "ACVM application for New Zealand registration will be made at a future date" and assumed that the EPA was solely responsible from a hazardous substances perspective

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On 31/10/2018 at 7:44 AM, Philbee said:

Yes, however there are other theories that involve keeping Apivar out of the Spring hives and using OA instead.
Saving the Apivar for late summer.
In my view this wastes the Staples real power which is seen post harvest running through winter.
These things can be stacked into these late season/ winter hives ensuring a clean Spring start 

Those Hives that continue breeding through winter can really benefit from an ongoing control method

I expect that is because MPI approved Amitraz treatments for a 10 week period with a two week withholding period making timing critical for those with honey flows in the lead up to Christmas

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On 31/10/2018 at 8:06 AM, M4tt said:

Personal preference. I’ve never had treatment in during a flow . I’ll hit them again mid Feb. That way with a break, the bees should do what bees do and the varroa will get a shock again, rather than being continually exposed, which I don’t think they need to be. 

Also the residues thing. If there is nothing in the hive , there won’t be residues. 

 

Apivar in the autumn didn’t work for me so I won’t be doing that 

Hey, @M4tt if you spy mites in a hive with a honey super on what would you do?

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2 hours ago, Jo Jo said:

Hey, @M4tt if you spy mites in a hive with a honey super on what would you do?

Well I know there are no mites in there now, supers have just gone on ..

I stop inspecting brood around the longest day , then I don’t look in again till I do my pre harvest AFB check at the start of Feb. There will certainly be mites in drone brood and getting up in numbers by then , as the honey comes off, treatment goes in. 

Short answer, I’d do nothing if the hive is flourishing through the flow. 

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15 hours ago, glynn said:

EPA approval is required to sell the strips as a varroaside like other treatments. The name on the approval is not who we did the tests for but same stuff. As it's listed as a treatment it will be legal to use and sell it will be interesting to see the conditions of use doc as it's classed as a organic treatment in it's home country with little restrictions. 

Sorry for the late reply I was playing with some new toys

When did you trial this product Glynn?

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4 hours ago, Dennis Crowley said:

rule no 1 look after the hive, i have placed  bayvarol on hives during honey flow one year as mite numbers were to high. Beeks seem to think that when hives on a honey flow they don't need looking after or checking on. With varroa as it is you need to be vigilant. 

and even further to what @Dennis Crowley has stated, it's expressly permitted to use bayvarol as an emergency treatment during a honey flow.

Dead bees and varroa bombs benefit nobody.

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13 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

@Philbee is that the equivalent of a production  sewing machine " commercial kitchen "

Is that all just for the tape sewing .?

That piece in the photo is just one third of the production line for EP Staples.
The non EP are much simpler to make and that is why Beeks need to be realistic when using EPs
IMO only 20% max of any Staple order needs to be EP
Maybe Stoney and James are exceptions but most beeks including me dont need mountains of them.

However from a production point of view its important to cover the whole spectrum of hive requirements no matter the cost

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1 hour ago, yesbut said:

It's more soluble in fat/wax than Bayvarol

Apivar (Amitraz) quickly breaks down into compounds which are water soluble and can contaminate honey. Bayvarol (flumethrin) is oil (wax) soluble so is only present in honey if the honey has lots of wax in it.

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45 minutes ago, Philbee said:

That piece in the photo is just one third of the production line for EP Staples.
The non EP are much simpler to make and that is why Beeks need to be realistic when using EPs
IMO only 20% max of any Staple order needs to be EP
Maybe Stoney and James are exceptions but most beeks including me dont need mountains of them.

However from a production point of view its important to cover the whole spectrum of hive requirements no matter the cost

Can I please have 36000 EPs ASAP.. 

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10 hours ago, Philbee said:

When did you trial this product Glynn?

It was a few years ago now Phill before Scott towels ect they work very well. I believe that there's more to it than oxcalic and glycerin sooked in overboard strips, but it's the closest thing I can get to it the new Gib packing strips things are in hives at the moment look good.

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I'm curious to know why S. Island Beekeepers are the problem ones ?  Maybe we are more enlightened and using more of them.

I passed on your number Phil to a mate I met at the garage yesterday. Reading between the lines he's had a tough time using the o/a vapour. He commented that out of a yard of twelve it was only really effective on 10%.

I showed him your staples . He's normally quite a vocal man but for thirty seconds or so he was quit speechless.

 

The big question is whether we use them as our primary autumn treatment. It's probably like the big question I had for spring treatement .....Could we rely on them ?

The  answer to the second question   is yes, so maybe the answer to the first question is  "let's give it a go".  I know for a fact that some of last years autumn Apivar treatments in a couple of very strong yards were pretty marginal.

 

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8 hours ago, Jamo said:

Apivar (Amitraz) quickly breaks down into compounds which are water soluble and can contaminate honey. Bayvarol (flumethrin) is oil (wax) soluble so is only present in honey if the honey has lots of wax in it.

I knew it was something like this ?

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43 minutes ago, jamesc said:

I'm curious to know why S. Island Beekeepers are the problem ones ?  Maybe we are more enlightened and using more of them.

I passed on your number Phil to a mate I met at the garage yesterday. Reading between the lines he's had a tough time using the o/a vapour. He commented that out of a yard of twelve it was only really effective on 10%.

I showed him your staples . He's normally quite a vocal man but for thirty seconds or so he was quit speechless.

 

The big question is whether we use them as our primary autumn treatment. It's probably like the big question I had for spring treatement .....Could we rely on them ?

The  answer to the second question   is yes, so maybe the answer to the first question is  "let's give it a go".  I know for a fact that some of last years autumn Apivar treatments in a couple of very strong yards were pretty marginal.

 

All I can say is that its been my only treatment for to Autumns.
Ive had loses here and there but not a single Varroa related one.

One thing Ive realised is that Ive put a lot of effort into supplying others with good Queens and have neglected my own.
That wont happen again.

My Taupo Beek Mate is still vaguely suspicious that I secretly use synthetics on the side.

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