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The object is to look at the "Check", not to see how much honey the Hive can make.
There are plenty of 4 box hives out there but this Hive was used because it was small and not likely a star preformer.
I do this sort of thing often, that is stack the odds against a Hive, set it up to fail and when it doesn't then thats a sound result.
 

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Absolutely Phil, and very pleased you are doing the research.

 

 

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Another standout observation,
The quality of a Spring Hive is a result of its previous summer Mite counts.
Even if a Hive goes into winter with a Zero count, it will struggle if its previous Summer Mite loads were high.
The idea is to maintain low Mite counts throughout the season.


 

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This would be at odds with your previous standout observation that your hives can tolerate very high mite loads, counts of hundreds, and be absolutely fine.

Edited by Alastair
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1 hour ago, Philbee said:

Another standout observation,
The quality of a Spring Hive is a result of its previous summer Mite counts.
Even if a Hive goes into winter with a Zero count, it will struggle if its previous Summer Mite loads were high.
The idea is to maintain low Mite counts throughout the season.


 

I have had severly damage hives in autumn. With a bit of care these can be great hives in spring. Agree, low mite counts overall is best limiting beekeeper input/costs.

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28 minutes ago, Gino de Graaf said:

I have had severly damage hives in autumn. With a bit of care these can be great hives in spring. Agree, low mite counts overall is best limiting beekeeper input/costs.

One thing I dont do is fix hives in Spring, with the exception of Drone layers.
Drone layers are simple and cheap to fix.
The nature of what I do demands that I play with the cards dealt in spring

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Drone layers or laying workers?

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11 hours ago, Gino de Graaf said:

I have had severly damage hives in autumn. With a bit of care these can be great hives in spring. Agree, low mite counts overall is best limiting beekeeper input/costs.

If you track those Hives that have high Summer/Autumn counts, my opinion  is that they will reappear down the track as problem Hives.
It becomes a treadmill of tail chasing

Edited by Philbee

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23 hours ago, Alastair said:

I think this demonstrates it, you could call the hive checked. A typical commercial beekeeper would be expecting such a split made when it was, to be in at least 4 boxes by now.

In the South Waikato and up at Tokoroa (which is at the same elevation as Taupo) the only way hives would be in 4 boxes now would be from either having a full box of honey on from over wintering and/or 50kg of sugar being fed to them. White Clover has only just started to pop up, it won’t flow until end of December at the earliest I reckon.

certainly amazing how hives build up throughout the country.

 

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8 minutes ago, Maggie James said:

People say that my creamed clover honey (creaming& packing by Sheehans) is that  best they have ever tasted.  That is cos Sheehans have great creaming skills, but my clover honey has an incredibly high clover count.  Maybe NZ or Canterbury should market premium clover honey!!!!! The reality is that my clover honey has a higher clover content than the stuff on the supermarket shelf and is therefore preiumum; combined with superior creaming skills. 

Oh ..... I thought mine was the best ..... also creamed by Sheehans !!

21 hours ago, Philbee said:

One thing I dont do is fix hives in Spring, with the exception of Drone layers.
Drone layers are simple and cheap to fix.
The nature of what I do demands that I play with the cards dealt in spring

Spring is the time for fixing hives.

The time for taking from the strong and giving to the weak.

When I see hives at Christmas stacked up with six and two  I surmise that someone did'nt take the time it takes to even them up.

They were lazy.

But there yah go .... Crate day makes one a bit lippy, right.

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6 minutes ago, jamesc said:

Oh ..... I thought mine was the best ..... also creamed by Sheehans !!

 

Well there yer go!  Two quality suppliers of clover honey, get it creamed by Sheehans.  They definitely have the touch.  Cos, for 20 years my customers have raved about my clover honey

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16 minutes ago, Maggie James said:

People say that my creamed clover honey (creaming& packing by Sheehans) is that  best they have ever tasted.  That is cos Sheehans have great creaming skills, but my clover honey has an incredibly high clover count.  Maybe NZ or Canterbury should market premium clover honey!!!!! The reality is that my clover honey has a higher clover content than the stuff on the supermarket shelf and is therefore preiumum; combined with superior creaming skills. 

Not "clover" again.The most common honey on the world market.

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The reason is that it is the most common honey on the world market is that it is the most diluted.

 

I would really like to see New Zealand promoting it as a premium clover honey, with a pollen count higher than the international average.  I have produced 80-90% clover and my customers are gaga, along with Bazza's creaming skills.  I can't understand why NZ isn't marketing premium clover. 

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1 minute ago, Maggie James said:

The reason is that it is the most common honey on the world market is that it is the most diluted.

 

I would really like to see New Zealand promoting it as a premium clover honey, with a pollen count higher than the international average.  I have produced 80-90% clover and my customers are gaga, along with Bazza's creaming skills.  I can't understand why NZ isn't marketing premium clover. 

Honey ..... believe me ..... we are trying to .

35ACC6A6-173B-4126-9B99-AD0E3265B6E4.jpeg

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1 minute ago, jamesc said:

Honey ..... believe me ..... we are trying to .

We need to promote our monofloral natives, beech dew, and the likes of clover the higher than world average on pollen count.  I can't understand why something so simple hasn't been championed. 

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While splitting some three decker hives this afternoon that were jam packed with brood, I came accross this flyer in the paper. We use a lot of newspaper when splitting bees.

So I offer it up .... a trade secret and point of difference for New Zealand honey, because we are "Bujne" people that aspire to be at the top of our game, whether as Bee Keepers, or farmers, or sailors ..... I won't mention the rugby ..... 

I don't mind sharing information like this ..... there are people out there better  at marketing than I, but this is where we need to be going. 

The only catch as I see it, is that to be Carbon neutral you should just give up Sky Diving.

 

13 minutes ago, Maggie James said:

We need to promote our monofloral natives, beech dew, and the likes of clover the higher than world average on pollen count.  I can't understand why something so simple hasn't been championed. 

I thought Airborne were our Champions for monofloral honeys ......

Edited by jamesc
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Can't say without my magnifying glass, that I can spot the word "Bujne" (will remember it next time I am playing the competitive whanau in scrabble-.  Unfortunately our industry places a lot of importance on marketing and communication degrees, and the word governance.  Have absolutely no idea what the word governance means, but I know it cuts out a lot of logical, practical, common sense, business wise and successful  people who can't or who do not what to belittle themselves to talk this talk.

 

 

 

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Ah ..... 'Bujne" .......  is Ghorkali for Thinking .  In Nepal a 'Bujne Manche' is a smart Dude..... 

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1 minute ago, jamesc said:

Ah ..... 'Bujne" .......  is Ghorkali for Thinking .  In Nepal a 'Bujne Manche' is a smart Dude..... 

We  use the OED as reference when needed

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OED ....?

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1 minute ago, jamesc said:

OED ....?

 

Oxford English Dictionary

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Ah no  ...... won't be in that. But try the Merendonk Ghorkali dictionary.

You on the Gin again tonight ?

😘

Edited by jamesc
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2 minutes ago, jamesc said:

Merendonk Ghorkali dictionary

Doesn't come up in google.  I am not a gin drinker!  I am a serious scrabble player and follower of the OED!!!!!  Anyway, gotta go and cage some queens.  Then am off to catch some blue cod for a few days. 

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