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Oxalic and glycerine

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4 hours ago, ChrisM said:

I put on a measured amount so there is no surplus. I weigh the staples and divide by 14g to estimate the number of staples. then I multiply that figure by 20g the amount of solution for each staple. This gives me a weight of goup. I measure into a pot 40% of that as OA and 60% of that in G. I never squeeze any out. I do have to rotate the bucket multiple times over a number of days to get it to all disappear. I avoid using any staples that are wet whether squeezed or not. After a good long while they are somewhat dry to the touch. Well, not dry, but certainly not wet. They completely ruin regular gloves, but as soon as they do, a visit blackwoods allows you to do what I have done in the photo and now my gloves last forever. Discussed previously in BoP Group posts on the forum. These are a mesh glove with a rubber surface originally purchased for concreting. By sliding them inside regular leather gloves they are fine. I have had the odd sting through the mesh part, but overall I find them very comfortable. Compared to the disposable ones, I find this much less sweaty and I don't have to throw away disposable gloves into landfill every time I go beekeeping. I dissolve the solution on low on kitchen stove in a cheap ss pot off trademe. Once it goes clear, I take this outside and pour it on to my staples in a 10 litre bucket. I then rinse and clean the ss pot. I only do between 60 and 120 staples at a time, I'm only at quite small scale. Takes me ages to get through an orange bucket.. As you can see from the green dot, in one of the photos I have used this setup routinely for a while now.

 

OAG Gloves2.jpg

OAG Gloves.jpg

 

Could I please have a closer look at your sack barrow Chris?

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1 hour ago, CHCHPaul said:

 

Could I please have a closer look at your sack barrow Chris?

sure it is nothing special. It is one of those super cheap carts, such as every van courier in the country uses but I screwed some wood on the bottom to make the lip or load pad larger in area.  If it was used for heavy loads it would break off, or rip out, but I use it for moving around Nuc boxes and it has been awesome around home on flat ground. However, these carts have TWO wheels and there is a problem for hills and slopes unless you can go straight up/down the slope with the combs in plane. My latest invention is that I purchased a cheap used wheelbarrow off trademe for $30 and unscrewed the tub to leave me with two chassis rails, pnuematic tyre/wheel and legs. Then I put on a base so I can lift a hive on to this and strap it down and go a reasonable distance effortlessly and on cross-slopes. All my apiaries are permanent ones, but you still have to get it there to begin with and nothing is forever. It is I hasten to add all the fault of Yesbut (no surprises there) a long time ago he showed us his "truck" in a thread of that name and so I guess it is his IP I've  imitated. I've been mulling over the wheel barrow thing ever since. I have set up my wheel barrow to take Nuc's and full hives  both long wise and cross-wise. if you're keen I can show you some more photos in due course. If anyone wants to buy a wheel barrow tub I have one $30 :) .

2 hours ago, Josh said:

Thanks again for glove idea

They are easy to take off, but there is a nack to putting them on. Initially I used to put on the concreting gloves and then pulled on the fingerless gauntlets afterward. Nowadays I keep them together the whole time, I just grip the cuff of the concrete glove to hold it firm while getting my hand into that part. So now the time involved is just a couple of seconds slower. Just means I start putting them on earlier..

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I nipped out today to look at some Hives.

This is some of what I found and is not the pick of the bunch

There were some smaller hives though but still ready to bound away with some sunshine

spring 19  3.jpg

spring 19 2.jpg

spring 19 hive 4.jpg

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Very nice. And strong! Got a game plan for surplus bees/brood? 

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Been having a cruise around the last few days

Think I might move my bees upto Taupo

F4F3B55C-1D51-4B8F-B519-E513CB4DBE1D.jpeg

8BDD9150-F2B4-4F51-86F7-301BFBCEAE0E.jpeg

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47 minutes ago, jamesc said:

Been having a cruise around the last few days

Think I might move my bees upto Taupo

F4F3B55C-1D51-4B8F-B519-E513CB4DBE1D.jpeg

8BDD9150-F2B4-4F51-86F7-301BFBCEAE0E.jpeg

At least it is queen right.

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The two extremes .

goodness knows why there’s such a massive difference. 

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Aye for sure .... The Good Man knows.

3676F62E-5E20-4572-8C2E-11CCF8E49B08.jpeg

6 minutes ago, jamesc said:

Aye for sure .... The Good Man knows.

3676F62E-5E20-4572-8C2E-11CCF8E49B08.jpeg

 

Anyway .... today while in town picking up more sugar, I went to another Doctor. to try and sort out my affliction. I generally find that it's best to get a second opinion on the serious ailments. This doctor was real good...... he put me in the draw for a a chiller with a Foozeball pitch on the top of it.   Just the thing for the smoko room in a long hot summer.  He also commented that i might get lucky as I was the only client buying the stuff !.

Not sure what it's got to do with Oxcalic ..... but it's a sort of disease.

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43 minutes ago, Trevor Gillbanks said:

At least it is queen right.

 

Just what I thought when I saw one of mine in the same situation (not quite that bad). I think some hive in Canterbury with less sun haven’t realised it’s spring yet

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1 hour ago, jamesc said:

Been having a cruise around the last few days

Think I might move my bees upto Taupo

F4F3B55C-1D51-4B8F-B519-E513CB4DBE1D.jpeg

8BDD9150-F2B4-4F51-86F7-301BFBCEAE0E.jpeg

Looked like one of the hives I opened on Saturday

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1 hour ago, frazzledfozzle said:

The two extremes .

goodness knows why there’s such a massive difference. 

There’s a million reasons why there’s a massive difference... 

its putting your finger on which ones.. 

we were carting brood around today, 

Playing Robin Hood.. stealing from the rich  and giving to the poor. 

Some of the brood receivers on the cold side of the valley looked like that.. punched 4 frames of emerging brood into them they will soon be raging. 

Warm side of the valley the willow trees in bloom above us humming with bees as we placed pollen traps, equalised them grinning like fat cats at the fresh nectar and slabs of brood.. poles apart in strength, a few kms apart in distance. 

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No rush with us this year ..... I know for a fact that I'm working for nothing this year.  1000 hives ..... we won't make up all the duds .... 30kg/hive @$4.00  ....  the hired labour bill is 120k before you start  buying sugar or diesel  ..... It's just a case of keeping enough bees alive to have something to work with when the market improves. Low profile, low cost.

Edited by jamesc
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49 minutes ago, jamesc said:

No rush with us this year ..... I know for a fact that I'm working for nothing this year.  1000 hives ..... we won't make up all the duds .... 30kg/hive @$4.00  ....  the hired labour bill is 120k before you start  buying sugar or diesel  ..... It's just a case of keeping enough bees alive to have something to work with when the market improves. Low profile, low cost.

I had a moderate hive going into winter I put strips in . It was a dampish not so sunny spot and this hive declined.

I had a weak hive with a late summer supersedure queen  with strips in I moved into the hakea .

It is now bursting with two boxes of bees.

Could it be that temp and flow and a new queen kept the  bee population up .

Maybe strips work if the hive is breeding .

Maybe it needs the numbers of bees to keep at a certain temp .

I also saw that in the weak hive where the srips were in the middle of the frames it had isolated the bees to one side or the other.

However in the strong hive they had no affect on where brood and bees were .

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The big hives in my photos are no big deal and a dime a dozen but its the small Nucs that tell a story.
Those are my mating nucs with a 3 frame super on top and to get them through summer to spring they need to be in perfect health with a good Queen.

These ones are in a frosty hole but get good sun.

When a beek can get these through winter with no loses he knows his system is sound.

5 hours ago, frazzledfozzle said:

The two extremes .

goodness knows why there’s such a massive difference. 

If I sent samples from my Hives away for testing they would come back clean because Ive spent 3 years cleaning them

Its not rocket science

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10 hours ago, Philbee said:

If I sent samples from my Hives away for testing they would come back clean because Ive spent 3 years cleaning them

Its not rocket science

If it is considered possible to wipe out AFB if all beeks got it together would it be possible to wipe out varroa too.?

Or would there always be a wild swarm somewhere out there  with varroa .

 

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8 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

If it is considered possible to wipe out AFB if all beeks got it together would it be possible to wipe out varroa too.?

Or would there always be a wild swarm somewhere out there  with varroa .

 

With current technology it would be impossible to wipe out Varroa because it would only take a few survives to restart the population.
If we killed every hive in NZ and went Beeless for 5 or 6 years then that might do it 
However the cost of this would be catastrophic and there would still be a risk of a mite existing somewhere that could restart the population,  undoing the sacrifice of the 5-6 years.

So, Not possible.

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if we did get rid of the varroa mite, it could easily come back via an air/port just the same as it did the first time it arrived. Australia has so far managed to keep it out, but they've not been so lucky with small hive beetle nor EFB. Nobody seems to be able to manage their borders 100%.

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22 hours ago, Stoney said:

There’s a million reasons why there’s a massive difference... 

its putting your finger on which ones.. 

we were carting brood around today, 

Playing Robin Hood.. stealing from the rich  and giving to the poor. 

Some of the brood receivers on the cold side of the valley looked like that.. punched 4 frames of emerging brood into them they will soon be raging. 

Warm side of the valley the willow trees in bloom above us humming with bees as we placed pollen traps, equalised them grinning like fat cats at the fresh nectar and slabs of brood.. poles apart in strength, a few kms apart in distance. 

Yo .... these crap hives will come right.

Generally we catch the queen and pop her in a cage before introducing lotsa new bees. Or just build them up slowly ..... little bit of brood, switch positions with a strong hive, bit of syrup ..... an do the same again in a couple of weeks.

Been working on a different tangent today. Seeing as most other people have had great success with the staples we are trying to isolate causes for mass death. If we assume the staples work and we are still losing hives to a slow wasting demise, then lets look elsewhere....

So, we have been taking more  bee samples today   for  an independent lab to test for chemical residue.

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16 minutes ago, jamesc said:

If we assume the staples work and we are still losing hives to a slow wasting demise, then lets look elsewhere....

Hmmm so are all your colonies on the site in the same condition? Or are a few of them pretty good? 

I’ve got no doubt the staples work as we roll through our second spring.

youve shown heavy mite loads through sugar shaking.. Is this a contributor to the situation or do you have fairly clean bees at this point? 

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Well this is what gets me wondering.

We worked a yard of 96 this morning before the rain came in. 94 are dead.  I did a sugar shake on  the two survivors and they had no varroa.

So ..... the staples obviously worked on them ..... what killed the other 94 , or are the two survivors our VSH queens ....?

 

Like I have said before.... Yeah Nah .... I'll zip it because Mr Mod won't like the language.

 

It was an easy morning. We were done an dusted by smoko and went fishing for the rest of the day. 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by jamesc

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Sheesh.. 96 is a fairly juicy site.. 

Any fish for dinner? 

 

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Could the autumn dew flow and a reduced pollen intake be contributing factors? Where I tried them, in March, I had a strong willow dew flow and very little pollen. Queens shut down and nest shrinks plus ox acid hit... Small winter nests. My hives certainly smaller where ox gib used. 

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16 minutes ago, Stoney said:

Sheesh.. 96 is a fairly juicy site.. 

Any fish for dinner? 

 

Sheesh ... you a trier eh.

No Fish . Venison in a curry sauce with mashed spuds and silver beet that the chooks could'nt get to. The old stag that No 1 boy shot in the autumn is a beauty. I thought he'd be as rank as ..... oops..... that's probably politically incorrect in this era of veganism ..... so  I guess it was the Aroha he gave us when he came to visit, because he is as tender as heck.

Edited by jamesc

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3 minutes ago, jamesc said:

because he is as tender as heck

.....but unfortunately still doesn't taste like a nice big mutton leg chop

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2 minutes ago, jamesc said:

Sheesh ... you a trier eh.

Tryin to help solve some mysteries.. 

 

i recon Gino has hit the nail on the head with the autumn Dew. 

 

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