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4 hours ago, Gavin Smith said:

TALK to those who are putting it out there congratulations. It is really hard to see losses like this , let alone share it. We all know we  can feel bad finding AFB and so many do not share that from a sense of shame. 

I was in the dairy industry years ago when subsidies were removed and remember the toll on community and families. There will be beekeepers out there that are struggling to cope with low prices and losses like this. They can also tend to close down and not talk, stoic types you know, men's men etc.

Talk to your anyone or reach out to a professional. MIke King is on your side.Do not suffer in silence.

The healing power of man love eh☺️

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19 hours ago, jamesc said:

The total tally was 738 dead hives .... but ..." We are the boys from the bush right .... we don't back down  and we don't give up". Lyrics from  some country song.

Which is why I'm nervous to use O/A again until we have sorted our Modus Operandii.

A6AFCACB-0BD7-4044-8739-73EC9C483762.jpeg

Which brings me to my next point ...

Fonterra made a massive loss last year ..... watching Trade Me the market for beehives has collapsed .... reading the press China is busy steralising ethic minorities  while to the south the country is in revolt ..... I tend to echo Philbee ..... the last two years have been very tough ...... I am thinking the next two are gonna be even tougher.

 

So .... where to now Kimosabhe ?

Arohamai e hoa...sorry i dont have much to offer but if you ever in or near the Ktown district,call in for a hot tea bro.

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19 hours ago, kaihoka said:

 

Do you think it could go the way of solid energy ?

It is standard practice for the new CEO to write down assets and blame it on the previous CEO & Chairman.  Next year they will write those assets back up saying they are now performing and show a good profit and claim their bonuses and so the cycle starts all over again. 

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aaah here we go again.. our wee AFB recurring nightmare recurs again.. 

same site as last spring.. same first round check ... 5 with foulbrood.. 

old mate has a site up the road which has halved in size I see.. interesting.. 

and I also hear today there is another outfits shed based in range... 

well we dropped the whole damn site in the fire pit and lit up the dawn sky leaving a bittersweet taste in the mouth and a vow not to return til at least old mate retires. 

Good work by the guys as the bees were nice and strong but it was there.. under the  punctured capping. 

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Posted (edited)

Ah ....  old mate "Bacillus Larva"  ..... the hidden enemy and dogged survivor ..... no pun intended.

Remember we had that AFB outbreak down here last summer and we were all quaking in our boots at the fallout we were gonna get from that.

So far we are clear . 

Which raises the question that  are we  possibly our own worst enemies ?

Last night the sky to the east of here was glowing ..... but I tink that was the big city.

Edited by jamesc

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On 14/08/2019 at 7:57 PM, jamesc said:

The total tally was 738 dead hives .... but ..." We are the boys from the bush right .... we don't back down  and we don't give up". Lyrics from  some country song.

Which is why I'm nervous to use O/A again until we have sorted our Modus Operandii.

A6AFCACB-0BD7-4044-8739-73EC9C483762.jpeg

Which brings me to my next point ...

Fonterra made a massive loss last year ..... watching Trade Me the market for beehives has collapsed .... reading the press China is busy steralising ethic minorities  while to the south the country is in revolt ..... I tend to echo Philbee ..... the last two years have been very tough ...... I am thinking the next two are gonna be even tougher.

 

So .... where to now Kimosabhe ?

Hell that's alot of gaps to fill kimosabhe

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30 minutes ago, Nuc_man said:

Hell that's alot of gaps to fill kimosabhe

 

I heard a story once of a bk going around and doing his late Winter round and being rapt to find all these empty boxes with no bees in them, as he needed more empty boxes....is about the only way to look at it.....  It also amazes me how down there in the South how quickly you can bounce back from that level of losses, up here it would take years.

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36 minutes ago, CraBee said:

 

I heard a story once of a bk going around and doing his late Winter round and being rapt to find all these empty boxes with no bees in them, as he needed more empty boxes....is about the only way to look at it.....  It also amazes me how down there in the South how quickly you can bounce back from that level of losses, up here it would take years.

I guess so we had a 25% loss 20 yrs ago ended up being highest production year of that time. 

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I guess there are two ways to look at it.

With no challenge in life, life can get a bit ho hum.

And then with young queens, half the operation has been requeened and should exceed expectations.   And of course , with the honey price being in the doldrums and the nuc market being dead we really don't need to produce more bee products  this year, and I was wondering how to mothball hives.

 

So ..... after weighing up all the pro's and con's and consulting with the Doctor, I think we have a win win situation here. 

 

Yeah right. 

 

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My biology teacher constantly came out with "Adapt, change, migrate, or disappear."

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3 hours ago, yesbut said:

My biology teacher constantly came out with "Adapt, change, migrate, or disappear."

Theres a lot of humans in the world now who have opted for the third option .

Can't say I blame them .

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4 hours ago, jamesc said:

I guess there are two ways to look at it.

With no challenge in life, life can get a bit ho hum.

And then with young queens, half the operation has been requeened and should exceed expectations.   And of course , with the honey price being in the doldrums and the nuc market being dead we really don't need to produce more bee products  this year, and I was wondering how to mothball hives.

 

So ..... after weighing up all the pro's and con's and consulting with the Doctor, I think we have a win win situation here. 

 

Yeah right. 

 

I'll have spare queens in October if you need a hand, if you can handle my southern cross,  lol

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, yesbut said:

My biology teacher constantly came out with "Adapt, change, migrate, or disappear."

 

1 hour ago, Nuc_man said:

I'll have spare queens in October if you need a hand, if you can handle my southern cross,  lol

 

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5 hours ago, yesbut said:

My biology teacher constantly came out with "Adapt, change, migrate, or disappear."

I think we'll go for adapt and change ..... dog meat is quite good business now . 

Edited by jamesc
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The 3 teams should be finished the first round end of this week. 

Replacing staples.. feeding etc, overall they look good.. did some alcohol washes at this site on Friday.. 8,2,1,0 

this site is coastal and generally winters well. 

We have the usual amounts of dead’s so far a couple at each site.. the lack of DWV seen is awesome.. mites seen in some smaller colonies that had wintered away from the winter treatment on the outside frames. 

 

EB4533B7-0A31-4458-869A-D3EAD5801FAC.png

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@Stoney did you treat with staples the previous spring or is this autumn / winter treat,ent the first time the staples have been used in your hives ?

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2 hours ago, frazzledfozzle said:

@Stoney did you treat with staples the previous spring or is this autumn / winter treat,ent the first time the staples have been used in your hives ?

We began using staples this time last year so have now completed a full year using only 40% staples for controlling varroa. 

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On 18/08/2019 at 7:31 PM, jamesc said:

I think we'll go for adapt and change ..... dog meat is quite good business now . 

Good scheme! My dawg is large...$ per kilo boned out, bagged and frozen? 😊

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8 hours ago, Ali said:

Good scheme! My dawg is large...$ per kilo boned out, bagged and frozen? 😊

2 bucks ....not quite as good as honey ..... but youknow ...

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If anyone is happy sharing, I'll add to the short (ish) summary with the ways people wintered and their thoughts on results. It seems to have been an ok or even a good winter for many, but with at at least one horror story.

 

Ideally I'd have the Oa/GL strength used, the number of Staples put in (and were they left in?) and the Staple pattern - for example @Stoney has taken a subtly different path with his layout and seems to have had good results.

 

I wintered mine in 2x 3/4 boxes with 7 Staples that were 3/4 length, 40% OA. The Staples were put in such that each brood frame had a leg on each side.

On my first spring check I had 9, 0, 0, 9 mites. Despite the count, the bees looked really good, especially compared to last year. There are more bees, a better brood pattern, only I've only seen one DWV this winter.

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Aah .... ok .... we've moved on from dog meat ..... although suffice to say that man's best friend likes to eat every day ....  but yes , I'm not convinced that staple placement location is critically important , except it needs to be where bees will have a social interaction with it.

Funnily enough, one of the hives I sugar shook on friday was coming along nicely for the time of year. It had lotsa bees, lotsa honey, nice brood pattern  ... and I was shocked at the amount of mites that came out of the shaker.

Moral to the story ..... visual inspection is not good enough. 

 

The other big thought I had today was how as an industry we sort of lost an opportunity when we threw out the levy proposal.  We have so many  big challenges ahead of us ..... marketing, varroa , compliance ..... and yet are still so disjointed . Everyone with a valid point of view, but no cohesion.

Anyway .... Apimondia is coming up shortly. The guys from Ceracell will be there , flying the flag and show casing what New Zealand has to offer to the global community.

 

Safe travels guys.

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19 hours ago, cBank said:

If anyone is happy sharing, I'll add to the short (ish) summary with the ways people wintered and their thoughts on results. It seems to have been an ok or even a good winter for many, but with at at least one horror story.

 

Ideally I'd have the Oa/GL strength used, the number of Staples put in (and were they left in?) and the Staple pattern - for example @Stoney has taken a subtly different path with his layout and seems to have had good results.

 

I wintered mine in 2x 3/4 boxes with 7 Staples that were 3/4 length, 40% OA. The Staples were put in such that each brood frame had a leg on each side.

On my first spring check I had 9, 0, 0, 9 mites. Despite the count, the bees looked really good, especially compared to last year. There are more bees, a better brood pattern, only I've only seen one DWV this winter.

 

I have a variety of hive configurations from 3 frame nucs to double story FD. All wintered with 40% home made Staples run right through the middle. Typically a leg in each seam. Narrows for 5 frame nucs and ultra narrows for the 3 framers. 

 

Winter staples went in in May and have just been replaced during August. At least half were chewed out. During the week following insertion I observed many bee deaths out the door (I think from hatching brood touching the staples) - maybe 100 or so from each hive, but they bounce back quickly. 

 

In most cases this placement has caused a split frame - brood to the front, stores to the rear (see photos). Though the staples that are chewed out have brood right across the frame now. 

 

Regarding varroa, I lift out a fork of drone brood quite often and I’m finding none. (Yes, I have had drones all winter). But I’ve still got a few hives to go in the colder climates. 

 

 

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Been thinking about Maggi and Argentina. They used 3cm wide,  450cm long 3 (?) mm thick cardboard ox/gly. 4 in a single brood box. Noticed no bee loss. 

The Gibs are much wider and probably thicker.. So could these be distributing more Ox quicker? If placed at same rate. Causing bee mortality. 

 

 

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39 minutes ago, Gino de Graaf said:

Been thinking about Maggi and Argentina. They used 3cm wide,  450cm long 3 (?) mm thick cardboard ox/gly. 4 in a single brood box. Noticed no bee loss. 

The Gibs are much wider and probably thicker.. So could these be distributing more Ox quicker? If placed at same rate. Causing bee mortality. 

 

 

Wides are 400mm long, 1mm thick and 52mm wide weighing 13g

Narrows are 400mm long, 1.5mm thick and 28mm wide weighing 10g

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40 minutes ago, Philbee said:

Wides are 400mm long, 1mm thick and 52mm wide weighing 13g

Narrows are 400mm long, 1.5mm thick and 28mm wide weighing 10g

Thanks, that's your 4 layer ones? 

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18 minutes ago, Gino de Graaf said:

Thanks, that's your 4 layer ones? 

The wides are 4 layers and the narrows are 6 layers.

In my operation Bee mortality is highly variable but staple specs are not.

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