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Oxalic and glycerine

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1 hour ago, Philbee said:

It works for Stoners

The Staplers, sound like a country and western group from Gore, the Stoners sound like their roadies.

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51 minutes ago, Dennis Crowley said:

The Staplers, sound like a country and western group from Gore, the Stoners sound like their roadies.

And the synthetic strippers are from ??

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18 minutes ago, nikki watts said:

And the synthetic strippers are from ??

This sounds like the makings of  entertainement at the conference dinner ...... so whose going ?

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1 hour ago, jamesc said:

This sounds like the makings of  entertainement at the conference dinner ...... so whose going ?

Not me this yr, flights booked.

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3 hours ago, nikki watts said:

And the synthetic strippers are from ??

They are the after concert entertainment 

 

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15 hours ago, jamesc said:

This sounds like the makings of  entertainement at the conference dinner ...... so whose going ?

We are. 

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On 27/05/2019 at 8:20 PM, Philbee said:

I spoke with a Stapler today 

I done some alcohol washes in high density sites today and the first came up with 2 mites from 300 bees the second at another site came out at 1mite. All my hives wintered away from most other beeks has come back 0 mites

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The Autumn Efficacy trial for the Staples is all but wrapped up and its been and outstanding success.
It was late starting and the Mite counts at start date were getting up there.
The weather at 550m is rapidly cooling off and it is only due to good luck that fine  weather windows  allowed the hives to be opened 4 weekly for counts. (8 week trial)

The trial was a very thorough one with full photographic raw data sets and a Phd on site Audit  

Bees were individually counted for all washes.
Today I washed approx 6000 bees in 21 Hives for a total Mite count of 4 .
So 17 Hives had no Mites and 4 hives had 1 mite each.

The Control hives (extra to the 21 trial hives washed ) had on average 17 Mites/270 Bees and were all broodless

One separate  control hive was treated at week 4 with a count of 15/300 and at week 8 had a count of 2 mites for 270 Bees

 

The photo is fair representation of the trial hives mite decline across all treated hives using a single dose of 4 EPW staples in 40% Oxalic Acid/Glycerin to date.

IMG_3128.JPG

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My washes came back all 0-2 mites from 300 bees and I placed staples like bayvarol, I did notice a big decline In numbers especially in sites where I was getting 1 mite from 10 bees on average prior to treatment. (due to over crowding) 

I believe this is a really good product. 

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Posted (edited)

I washed a site last week. The single hives that were autumn nucs all came back 1/300.

by comparison my two strongest and most aggressive  hives in that apiary came in at 17 and 24 !!

 

Edited by nikki watts

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8 hours ago, nikki watts said:

17 and 24 !!

Robbers

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24 minutes ago, Philbee said:

Robbers

Those will be the ones most likely to contract AFB lol, I always worry about my hives because they are always pumping and I'm constantly re-infested and half my apiwebs red from neighbour AFB reporting although I only got it at one site this season 3x.

2 through spring and one during honey off

On 28/05/2019 at 7:23 PM, jamesc said:

This sounds like the makings of  entertainement at the conference dinner ...... so whose going ?

I might go for the first time this year

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1 hour ago, Philbee said:

Robbers

That’s what I decided too. Also they were in 3 boxes , all with staples but probably didn’t need to be so they’ve been packed down to two so they have no chance to avoid the staples.

In one the queen and started to lay in what I expected to be the empty bottom box with old comb to be cycled out.  She was hiding from the staples with brood in frames 2,3,4. No pollen and hardly any honey. 

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10 hours ago, nikki watts said:

That’s what I decided too. Also they were in 3 boxes , all with staples but probably didn’t need to be so they’ve been packed down to two so they have no chance to avoid the staples.

In one the queen and started to lay in what I expected to be the empty bottom box with old comb to be cycled out.  She was hiding from the staples with brood in frames 2,3,4. No pollen and hardly any honey. 

I saw a similar thing today while wrapping up my trial

Worst hive in the trial is a 4 box hive with a single box brood where the staples are. (Honey still on)

The bottom box was empty except for a cup of bees with the Queen and there was a huge cluster in the next two boxes where the phoretic mites were safe.
Here's the hive's data

6-4-18   10/300  = 3.3%

6-5-19   3/265   =   1.3%

4-6-19    4/ 296  =  1.3%
Any other hive in the trial with this ones initial progress would be at zero now.
This is a bit of a worry as I have lots of non trial hives that are currently 4 boxes on single broods with staples in the bottom box
Luck 1.3% is ok.

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Yep, I observed exactly this a while back . Bees empty the bottom box and move up . The Staples must be moved with the cluster otherwise they are ineffective and mites build up in numbers 

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12 hours ago, Philbee said:

Robbers

 

The pumping hives are more likely to not have a brood brake, hence the difference in mites.

These hive are so crowded that they have an army to get out even when is spitting out there and no sun at all. They bring a little bit of food into the hive the the queen will keep going.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Kiwi Bee said:

 

The pumping hives are more likely to not have a brood brake, hence the difference in mites.

These hive are so crowded that they have an army to get out even when is spitting out there and no sun at all. They bring a little bit of food into the hive the the queen will keep going.

 

 

Big strong hives rob more which is one reason they have more mites
My trial and experience has shown that Mites in big hives with lots of Brood can easily be controlled with 8 weeks of treatment
What is far more difficult to deal with is the constant arrival of new mites from other hives, most of which probably arrive on returning robber bees.
This is why a hive needs ongoing protection through late summer / Autumn period

 

37 minutes ago, SeanMonica said:

Good work @Philbee, looking forward to next debrief.

The most interesting aspect of the work Ive done doesn't relate to Hives that have been treated but instead what is really interesting are the Hives that I left untreated.
 

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2 hours ago, Kiwi Bee said:

 

The pumping hives are more likely to not have a brood brake, hence the difference in mites.

These hive are so crowded that they have an army to get out even when is spitting out there and no sun at all. They bring a little bit of food into the hive the the queen will keep going.

 

 

The queen in our hive  with 24 mites had been on a brood break, was broodless for at least 4 weeks by my records. She must have started to lay again about 2 weeks ago. 

this extended brood break while the staples were at their freshest would have meant a very effective treatment which is why I suspect they have been robbing hives around the area. 

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3 hours ago, M4tt said:

Yep, I observed exactly this a while back . Bees empty the bottom box and move up . The Staples must be moved with the cluster otherwise they are ineffective and mites build up in numbers 

 

So in anticipation when I packed them down for winter, every box (2 x 3/4) got 4 staples. Between work & weather I really struggle to get meaningful access from April onwards. But wherever the cluster goes, there will be staples

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11 hours ago, Philbee said:

I saw a similar thing today while wrapping up my trial

Worst hive in the trial is a 4 box hive with a single box brood where the staples are. (Honey still on)

The bottom box was empty except for a cup of bees with the Queen and there was a huge cluster in the next two boxes where the phoretic mites were safe.
Here's the hive's data

6-4-18   10/300  = 3.3%

6-5-19   3/265   =   1.3%

4-6-19    4/ 296  =  1.3%
Any other hive in the trial with this ones initial progress would be at zero now.
This is a bit of a worry as I have lots of non trial hives that are currently 4 boxes on single broods with staples in the bottom box
Luck 1.3% is ok.

Sounds like you left your honey crop on😆

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46 minutes ago, jamesc said:

Sounds like you left your honey crop on😆

For sure

I wasn't going to the expense in time and money of taking it off only to have it sit around as a liability.
That just makes a bad situation worse.
 

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12 hours ago, Philbee said:

I saw a similar thing today while wrapping up my trial

Worst hive in the trial is a 4 box hive with a single box brood where the staples are. (Honey still on)

The bottom box was empty except for a cup of bees with the Queen and there was a huge cluster in the next two boxes where the phoretic mites were safe.
Here's the hive's data

6-4-18   10/300  = 3.3%

6-5-19   3/265   =   1.3%

4-6-19    4/ 296  =  1.3%
Any other hive in the trial with this ones initial progress would be at zero now.
This is a bit of a worry as I have lots of non trial hives that are currently 4 boxes on single broods with staples in the bottom box
Luck 1.3% is ok.

Come April all my hives are turned around so single brood box is on top and honey box below. A bit of work but very good for keeping cluster in contact with strips / staples and warm.

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25 minutes ago, Jamo said:

Come April all my hives are turned around so single brood box is on top and honey box below. A bit of work but very good for keeping cluster in contact with strips / staples and warm.

Queen excluder on or off?

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2 hours ago, Philbee said:

Queen excluder on or off?

Excluder stays on. It has a drone escape which becomes the entrance as I block the bottom entrance so the undefended honey doesn't get pinched.

I also add a 2nd excluded on top to keep queen out of the top feeder. 

In the past I have tried having a single excluder with entrance on top but have had issues with bees not using the top entrance and dying trying to get out the blocked bottom entrance. all bases are mesh. As long as I reverse the boxes soon enough in the spring the system works well for me and solves a number of issues but it's not for everyone.

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