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Oxalic and glycerine

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4 hours ago, kaihoka said:

@Philbee did you have to play with the tension much sewing that medium .

 

No not at all.
I run light to medium tension at around 10m/min

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5 hours ago, Philbee said:

Borage this reads very much like a Patent application?
Its over my head really but what I can say is that one of the claims with regard the stitch is that the stitch lines acts as a physical barrier to chewing.

The Bees tend to chew in from the edge toward the center
If they encounter a line of thread it will slow them down allowing the Tape to remain in the hive for a longer period.
Also, bees dont eat with their chewing equipment

Hi Philbee

Not a patent application, just trying to understand better myself and perhaps help some of the other newer beeks too. I have read most of the posts in 90 pages and it's a great collaborative effort and very interesting; thanks to all involved. As has been noted recently a summary of the outcomes would be helpful.

RE: "bees dont eat with their chewing equipment". Yes understood, but perhaps the common chew and swallow concept humans have causes some confusion w.r.t. honeybee anatomy and the use of mandibles as a cutting tool. It is possible to see close-up video of the bees using mandibles cutting on queencells and manipulating wax, but slightly off topic I have not yet seen video of bees eating (pollen as) bee bread (from a cell in the brood area) to really understand how bees deal with ingesting a paste rather than sucking a liquid through the probiscus. This is likely due to the impracticalities of getting a camera into a cell the bee has its head in. The main point is the cutting or chewing the OA-G staple is not related to eating the OA-G staple. I do recall a post about OA-G concentrations and potentially harming a bees stomach so not entirely sure how that fits in. Do the bees probe the staple with the probiscus, or does OA somehow get into nectar stores?

RE: "...one of the claims with regard the stitch is that the stitch lines acts as a physical barrier to chewing. The Bees tend to chew in from the edge toward the center. If they encounter a line of thread it will slow them down allowing the Tape to remain in the hive for a longer period."

Agreed, and in comparison to shop cloths the staple is intended to keep the product in the brood area longer rather than just in the hive above or below the brood (which could include all the fluff ending up on the base). Cutting entirely through the tape at the top would effectively be the fastest way for a bee to remove the staple from the brood area, eroding all of the edges until there is nothing left not so fast. The multiple paper layers and rows stitching layers are intended to protects from both and in my opinion as a potential customer (doing due diligence) that is the value proposition (along with efficacy, organic materials and ease of use) as to why one would choose to use stitched staples rather than for example strips of cardboard, newspaper, cotton fabric, netting or twine.

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Righty ho

The Staples kill Mites by providing an acid solution that the Bees traipse around the hive and this acid solution eventually by one means or another contacts a Mite.
The Mite subsequently dies.
The Staple needs to remain in the Hive for 54 days or more so must either resist the Bees attempts to remove or be replaced by a vigilant Beekeeper if it is removed by the Bees in less than 54 days
Why would you use a Paper Tape Staple? rather than a piece of cardboard or other medium?-

I asked myself the same question and tried a variety of materials

And here we are


  

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2 hours ago, CHCHPaul said:

Sooooo many words.

Another touch typist

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59 minutes ago, yesbut said:

Another touch typist

I thought they were banned .

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On 29/11/2018 at 8:33 PM, yesbut said:

 

"Environmental Assessment Environmental Fate EPA relied on data available in the scientific literature to assess the environmental fate and transport of oxalic acid used as a pesticide. Oxalic acid occurs widely in nature--it is present in the tissues of many plants and algae, serving both to excrete and store calcium. In water, its negative ion forms complexes with a number of metal ions; and oxalic acid is immobilized as a result of this formation of complexes. Both aerobic and anaerobic conditions biodegrade oxalic acid in less than one day"

 

https://archive.epa.gov/pesticides/reregistration/web/pdf/4070fact.pdf

 

thats what they say about 1080.......... it occurs in nature (apparently) 

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11 hours ago, Philbee said:

Borage this reads very much like a Patent application?
Its over my head really but what I can say is that one of the claims with regard the stitch is that the stitch lines acts as a physical barrier to chewing.

The Bees tend to chew in from the edge toward the center
If they encounter a line of thread it will slow them down allowing the Tape to remain in the hive for a longer period.
Also, bees dont eat with their chewing equipment
 

 

is it not about time to patent it yourself Phibee - after all its all your own IP that is producing it..... before some other Borage comes along and takes it to a large entity and pumps the out and leaves your efforts behind unrewarded. 

Or does this chronological record of creation establish you as the inventor? 

 

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9 hours ago, Jay said:

is it not about time to patent it yourself Phibee - after all its all your own IP that is producing it..... before some other Borage comes along and takes it to a large entity and pumps the out and leaves your efforts behind unrewarded. 

Or does this chronological record of creation establish you as the inventor? 

 

I patented it early this year
The edge protected Staple was invented a long time ago well before it was disclosed.
Everything I produce to the market has a successor in the wings
In this way Im always a few steps ahead of the Market.
Even the current EP Staple has not been disclosed in all its embodiment. 

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4 hours ago, Philbee said:

I patented it early this year
The edge protected Staple was invented a long time ago well before it was disclosed.
Everything I produce to the market has a successor in the wings
In this way Im always a few steps ahead of the Market.
Even the current EP Staple has not been disclosed in all its embodiment. 

If I brought it could I reverse engineer it . LOL 

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34 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

If I brought it could I reverse engineer it . LOL 

I doubt you would go to jail... for more than a week

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I have attempted to summarise the thread here. This thread is well worth reading in its entirety as it has much that is useful, but I found it a little hard to know current best practice when making my own. Hopefully I do now! I have been over it many times, but am sure there are many errors. Apologies if I have misstated what someone has said or incorrectly attributed content. Let me know and I'll fix it.

 

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On 4/12/2018 at 1:51 PM, kaihoka said:

If I brought it could I reverse engineer it . LOL 

 

As a life tip - messing with a former boxer (I think I have this right) who has lots of barrels and vast quantities of very strong acid seems a great way to disappear...

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So, my single row staples lasted somewhere between 9 & 13 weeks and are long gone. 

 

Traditionally no no more treatments would go on till honey comes off. 

 

Are people giving their bees a break till autumn/winter applications?

 

Or choosing a strategy like OA vaporisation with ongoing testing and reapply with some count threshold?

 

Or just putting more in and trying to keep it  there all the time?

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36 minutes ago, Josh said:

Or choosing a strategy like OA vaporisation with ongoing testing and reapply with some count threshold?

Gone with the dinosaurs I thought

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55 minutes ago, Josh said:

So, my single row staples lasted somewhere between 9 & 13 weeks and are long gone. 

 

Traditionally no no more treatments would go on till honey comes off. 

 

Are people giving their bees a break till autumn/winter applications?

 

Or choosing a strategy like OA vaporisation with ongoing testing and reapply with some count threshold?

 

Or just putting more in and trying to keep it  there all the time?

Its really important that you know how long the Staples that were over the middle frames lasted
That is the period that your Hive was effectively treated.
That said, Do a count, if its very low or zero you have some breathing space but not a lot

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37 minutes ago, yesbut said:

Gone with the dinosaurs I thought

I shall use my vapouriser this summer and staples in the autumn

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Some edge protected staples after 6 weeks. Not looking good for the mites.

Screenshot_20181210-080428.png

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4 hours ago, Jamo said:

Some edge protected staples after 6 weeks. Not looking good for the mites.

Screenshot_20181210-080428.png

I hope these Staples dont tire the Bees out 
 

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https://www.plantandfood.co.nz/growingfutures/case-studies/bees-to-combat-varroa

 

Quote from linked Article

"Varroa, a parasitic mite which infects honey bees and can transfer fatal viral pathogens, is a source of concern to the horticultural and agricultural industries which rely on bees for crop pollination. It is estimated that the introduction of the varroa mite, discovered in New Zealand in 2000, will cost the economy between $400 and $900 million over 35 years."

 

Judging by the flow of reports back from Staple users these Cost estimates can now be adjusted substantially downward.
Possibly by as much as 50%

 

 

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36 minutes ago, Philbee said:

https://www.plantandfood.co.nz/growingfutures/case-studies/bees-to-combat-varroa

 

Quote from linked Article

"Varroa, a parasitic mite which infects honey bees and can transfer fatal viral pathogens, is a source of concern to the horticultural and agricultural industries which rely on bees for crop pollination. It is estimated that the introduction of the varroa mite, discovered in New Zealand in 2000, will cost the economy between $400 and $900 million over 35 years."

 

Judging by the flow of reports back from Staple users these Cost estimates can now be adjusted substantially downward.
Possibly by as much as 50%

 

 

Got a phone call last night. Initially it was about some hive equipment but also had a very Interesting discussion with the older beekeeper in Taumaranui  about the oxalic cloths/boards/strips.

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36 minutes ago, dansar said:

Got a phone call last night. Initially it was about some hive equipment but also had a very Interesting discussion with the older beekeeper in Taumaranui  about the oxalic cloths/boards/strips.

And... 

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Hi all 

I moved the discussion about feeding Raw (dry) sugar over here. 

 

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