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  2. Sometimes you have to switch off the device and go out the back paddock to axe split some firewood.. i will add.. doing that at this time of night can not only be rather dangerous but also attract unwanted attention
  3. Too flammmin' tired to respond! If I got into a 'Sword Fight' over making a simple , basic statement on Inheritance, what could happen if I responded to Chris's Post?
  4. Hilarious is right! Rene knows his stuff. I’ve had the pleasure of sharing his ute around risk sites sniffing out the dreaded foulbrood. Rochelle also.. (James wife).. one mission springs to mind.. I’m at work in the office and receive a call from Rene regarding the night befores foulbrood sniff session.. he had received a call from the Police questioning his previous evenings activities after a concerned member of the public had seen his vehicle and people lifting a “sheep” over a gate and into the back of his ute! I had to call the local small towns copper to explain it was in fact a dog we had lifted over the gate into his well sign written ute.
  5. During my time with a local outfit we ran with winter vapour treatments for two autumn/winters. Some sites we ran an extra round to give a good solid treatment, blocked vented floors and went hard out to get round our sites on the correct days. the results were so varied It makes me shudder to think of the work and love that went into our attempts to have clean mite free hives come spring. Very disappointing. Since using the staple we were able to achieve very clean hives overall.. much cleaner than the old 2 synthetic treatments per season mentality. There are still the odd mite magnet mysteries but overall through 4-5k hives the dreaded mite is kept at a level where the bee can do its thing with relative freedom. It can take a bit to work it out but once there you won’t look back. good sites, young queens, love and oxalic acid are my recipe to pay the bills.
  6. electrolytes are the go. Drinking water just replaces lost water and your remaining salts are further diluted with every drink The result is a feeling of being washed out by days end. Add electrolytes and everything changes for the better. Also , drink warm water not cold water
  7. Box two, number one at the base, was placed in October. Hive was expanding so added another box, box one. Box two did have brood but has been now been backfill with pollen. They have essentially ignored box one, as it's partially drawn but not filled. I'll add Bayvarol tomorrow night, after work, and remove the lower/newer box to storage.
  8. @manzi remember it well! We had the world biggest fan, over 2 feet across probably closer to 3 feet (My brain is still too fried to think in metric) in the honey house. Terrible to clean but lovely to stand in front of even if it threw the odd bee at you. New yard tomorrow. No shade even for drinking water under! Coolest place is in the truck with the sunshade on the front window. Never rated them until recently when I worked out you could keep it up by attaching a couple of hair ties to the visor to hold it up! Drink the water, seek shade when you can. I three quarter freeze our water bottles and top them up to put in the chilly bin, works a treat!
  9. I would say that you are starting to think like a Beekeeper on this. There's always a story and this story is now starting to make some sense. As you have noted, the OA needs to actually get to where its needed and if it doesn't get there then the treatment wont work. Same story applies to winter OA vapor treatments Sometimes when you look at a tight winter cluster it is obvious that nothing is going to penetrate that cluster, not even OA vapor. This is a significant part of the general opinion that OA vapor is variable. The same principles apply to all contact treatments.
  10. why have you got two empty bottom boxes on? regardless, chuck in some strips and sort it out
  11. There's six boxes on this Warre hive. The brood starts at box three and ends at box five. Perhaps the vapour didn't/couldn't go high enough to properly reach brood. I was thinking of using Bayvarol again to get a quick knockdown. I know it's a repeat treatment, folloing spring, but desperate times call for desperate measures.
  12. This senerio could well be an evolving disaster. Just use the conventional treatments, its been suggested here before that a New Beek should ideally play by the book for a few years before experimenting too much Of course if you can afford to lose a few hives go hard, you will learn fast
  13. If you get 40 mites from a sugar shake an alcohol wash would have likely got 50 plus witch in my opinion means an apivar treatment at this time of year is unlikely to get the mites in Check in time to save the hive. Formic is good in this situation but maybe too hot at the moment. Ox gly is probably one of your better options. Surprising that vaping didn't seam to work so well for you.
  14. Ive got a gps track of it but there was no saving any of the camera gear. We hit a large wave that sent us vertical and came down on our back The Waves on the Bar were all of 3m high and vertical, we got smashed for 15min in the thick of it but it was an incoming tide so slowly got pushed off the Bar. My mate had a waterproof phone so Call 111 He told the operator that we were capsized on the Kawhia bar and needed help. She replied, "would you like Ambulance Fire or Police" A large boat then turned up and got our anchor rope around its Prop. Luckily he had enough power to get 100m off the Bar where we stopped and cut the rope off his prop shaft. Our boat took 3 hrs to drift in to the beach where we righted it and put it on the trailer. The Cops got us in through the forest to the beach to get the boat. 30k later we where fishing again.
  15. This is hilarious, A marketing person would have a word for it.
  16. I agree Grant, but right now I am whacked with working in this heat. Your suggestion, is on the to do list for sometime tomorrow. I am hitting the deck in the next few minutes! In the past the Hub has had a great response on this forum with articles under General Beekeeping, and we are incredibly grateful for that; because we are attempting to reach all levels of beekeepers to make our meetings successful; whether they be ApiNZ members or not. Regards. Maggie. Grant - You will be pleased to know, they we the Hub is really into feedback as to where attendees first saw our events, and the bee forum articles come up very high in the responses!
  17. It may be more beneficial to add each event to the calendar for the day in question as it will raise the visibility as the date gets closer
  18. I thought she was one of the dogs .
  19. I made up some gib tape staples and placed them in a Warre hive today, that had three boxes of brood with three staples in each box to cover the brood area. This was after four treatments of oxalic vapor at five day intervals. I did a sugar shake and counted 40 mites. Although I did expect a high count that's the highest mite count I've ever had in my hives. What's people's thoughts on how to proceed now. Do I preserver with the OA/GL staples, or add a conventional treatment with/in addition to the staples, or dispense with the OA/GL staples altogether and just use conventional treatments? My spring treatment was Bayvarol so the plan was to use Apivar for Autumn.
  20. Well my comments are that Chris got it in one. Wish I had his eloquence and ability to simply explain something.
  21. APINZ CANTERBURY HUB MEETING TUESDAY 25 FEBRUARY 6.00 PM SOLAR HONEY HOUSE. BBQ. BEEKEEPING TRUCKS & FIELD EQUIPMENT Where: Hantz Honey Ltd, 31 Lower Lake Road, Leeston. Parking available on site Online Reservation: Now open 6.30 pm Solar Power Presentation: Campbell McMath, Kea Energy, installer of solar panels will talk about the technology and answer questions. See https://www.keaenergy.nz/honey-factory-30kw Kea Energy own, operate, maintain and manage hydro-turbines and solar generating plants, in and around New Zealand. Kea Energy are a family-based company in Canterbury New Zealand. Kea Energy generate their own environmentally friendly electricity. They own, operate, maintain and manage hydro-turbines and solar generating plants. Kea Energy electricity generation is around 2.2GWH per annum, which is approximately 30% of Orion's (Christchurch/Canterbury’s lines company) total exported embedded generation. 7.00pm Crank Up The BBQ: $10 per person, includes sausages, bread, coleslaw. Bring your own drinks. Pay BBQ on the night. 7.15pm: Hive Reports. These reports are popular attendee attraction to Hub meetings. Beekeepers want to know about AFB incursions, varroa infestations, treatment regimens etc 7.30pm Beekeeping Trucks & Field Equipment: Bring along your trucks and field equipment, tools and innovations that make your work in the field easier and see what other beekeepers are using. Often the truck cab, is the office! This is an open invitation to bring trucks, utes, vans, machinery equipment etc for show & tell! We already have a large collection confirmed, and we would love to expand on largeness! 9.00 pm Wrap up. There is an option of a 40 minute return bush hide walk to Lake Ellesmere. Starting point Hantz Honey CANTERBURY HUB FEB MEETING ALL WELCOME TO EVENTS BUT ONLINE RESERVATION REQUIRED https://apinzcanterbury.org.nz/ BBQ CANCELLED AFTER 10.00 A.M. ON THE DAY WILL BE INVOICED
  22. APINZ CANTERBURY HUB MEETINGS FEB – MAY 2020 Our Canterbury Hub encompasses southern Marlborough, Canterbury, northern Otago, Westland and Chatham Island. Our membership includes a diverse range of beekeeping operations, many hobbyists and occupations. Considering the mix of our membership and the area we encompass; much thought is put into meeting programmes. We usually have five meetings a year with 25-50 attending, plus our main event the Beekeepers’ Day Out. ALL WELCOME TO EVENTS BUT ONLINE RESERVATION REQUIRED https://apinzcanterbury.org.nz/ FEBRUARY & APRIL MEALS CANCELLED AFTER 10.00 A.M. ON DAY WILL BE INVOICED TUESDAY 25 FEBRUARY 6.00 PM SOLAR HONEY HOUSE. BBQ. BEEKEEPING TRUCKS & FIELD EQUIPMENT Where: Hantz Honey Ltd, 31 Lower Lake Road, Leeston. Parking available on site Online Reservation As Above: Now open 6.30 pm Solar Power Presentation: Campbell McMath, Kea Energy, installer of solar panels will talk about the technology and answer questions. See https://www.keaenergy.nz/honey-factory-30kw Kea Energy own, operate, maintain and manage hydro-turbines and solar generating plants, in and around New Zealand. Kea Energy are a family-based company in Canterbury New Zealand. Kea Energy generate their own environmentally friendly electricity. They own, operate, maintain and manage hydro-turbines and solar generating plants. Kea Energy electricity generation is around 2.2GWH per annum, which is approximately 30% of Orion's (Christchurch/Canterbury’s lines company) total exported embedded generation. 7.00pm BBQ: $10 per person, includes sausages, bread, coleslaw. Bring your own drinks. Pay BBQ on the night. 7.15pm: Hive Reports. These reports are an essential attendee attraction to Hub meetings. Beekeepers want to know about AFB incursions, varroa infestations, treatment regimens etc 7.30pm Beekeeping Trucks & Field Equipment: Bring along your trucks and field equipment, tools and innovations that make your work in the field easier and see what other beekeepers are using. Often the truck cab, is the office! This is an open invitation to bring trucks, utes, vans, machinery equipment etc for show & tell! We already have a large collection confirmed, and we would love to expand on largeness! 9.00 pm Wrap up. TUESDAY 7 APRIL 6.00 PM SOCIALISING, HUB COMPLIMENTARY PLATTERS, COLONY LOSS SURVEY PRESENTATION, ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING, SIT DOWN MEAL Where: Leeston Bowling Club, 41-43 High St Online Reservation: Open 7 March Presentation: Colony Loss Survey. Pike Brown, Economist, Landcare Research. Pike will give an overview of the Survey from the last few years, with a focus on the data from our Hub area. This will be a chance for beekeepers to discuss the statistical numbers, look at the problems and work on any potential solutions. Whether you have one hive or thousands in the Hub area, this is an opportunity to discuss your logical concerns, potentially for input into the 2021 Survey. Annual General Meeting: Chair & Agenda to be advised Meal: Cost & sit down menu to be advised. SUNDAY 17 MAY 2020 CANTERBURY HUB BEEKEEPERS’ DAY OUT IMPROVING BEE HEALTH & SUSTAINABLE HIVE PRODUCTION PLUS, TRADE DISPLAYS STEWART BUILDING, LINCOLN UNIVERSITY This full day, over the last four years indicating great vibe, is excellent bang for your buck. Currently our aim is 150 seats (if we go over 150 reasonably early, we are in the supa duppa wonderful position to adapt). Feedback from last year’s event, indicates that 150 seats is highly feasible. Full day of approximately 16 speakers covering a variety of subjects, with much Q&A and discussion. Speakers include hobbyist and commercial beekeepers, recognised scientific community, and reputable market sector. There is something for everyone in this year’s programme. The information delivered by most speakers is transferable to hobbyist or commercial operations. Programme and trade display space available late February. Watch this space. Online attendee bookings: Open 7 March Attendee Cost: $65 pp ApiNZ member (includes all Hub Club members), $75 pp Non ApiNZ members. Includes a.m. & p.m. teas & lunch Watch this thread as updates & exciting news unfolds BEE THERE OR BEE UNCOMFORTABLY SQUARE!
  23. @Bron I know what you mean. Been roped into extracting this year to save employing another worker which we can't afford. Should have taken today's temp - it got to 38 at 1pm !! We try to start before 7am so we can finish by 2pm but doesn’t always work that way. Plus my feet are aching from standing on the concrete floor all day. Every hour or so I walk into the cool store and hug the walls😥 Looks like the next few days are going to be even hotter 😩
  24. Thank you Chris for you comments, especially the first sentence re sword fighting. Like most people at this time of the year, working in the field, I am flammin' tired. Would be v interested to hear David Yanke's comments on your post.
  25. At school I had 2 hives, with carniolan queens and all black drones. I caught a swarm from an italian hive down the gully and hived it below the tree where I caught it. About 20m from the other hives.. All golden drones. Within 2 days there were black drones in the italian hive and golden drones running around the carni hives.
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